FIRST 5 Commission Budget Meeting Packet

,

' .

FIRST 5

COMMISSION BUDGET MEETING
Agenda

· SANTA CLARA COUNTY

DATE:.

Tuesday, May 9, 2006

TIME:

9:30am-1 :00pm, Community Room

PLACE:

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County, 4000 Moorpark Avenue
San Jose, CA 95117

1.

Roll Call

2.

Public Comment

This portion of the meeting is reserved for persons desiring to address the Commission
on any matter not on the agenda. Speakers are limited to three minutes. The law does
not permit Commission action or extended discussion on an item not on the agenda
except under special circumstances. All statements that require a response may be
placed on the Agenda for the next regular meeting of the Commission.

3.

FY 2006-2007 Budget Presentation

a) FY 2006-2007 Budget Overview Presentation (B Mason) (Attachment)
b) New Funding Requests (B Mason) (Attachment)
Possible Action: Approve, modify or deny new funding requests.
i. Areas of Poverty Underserved in Power of Preschool
ii. Mexican Heritage Plaza
iii. VMC Foundation-Reach Out & Read Assessment Program
iv. United Way (2-1-1)
v. Santa Clara County Social Services Agency Public Engagement (Safe
Surrender)
vi. Happy Hollow Park & Zoo Renovation
c) Consider FY 2006-2007 Budget (B Mason) (Attachment)
Possible Action: Adopt recommended budget.

4.

Adjourn
In compliance with the American with Disabilities Act (ADA), those requiring reasonable ADA
accommodation for this meeting should notify FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
:u hours prior to the meeting at (408) 260-3700.

Item 3

FY 2006-2007 Budget
Presentation
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County Commission
May 9, 2006

Goals for the FY 2906-2007 Budget Meeting
FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

1. Review and discuss the recommended
FY 2006-07 Budget.
2. Review the recommended new funding
requests.
3. Adopt the recommended FY 2006-07 Bud,get.

The First 5 years.

1

Make them count.

Where are we now on the annual fiscal timeline?
FIRST 5

SANTA CLAIIA COUNTY

Staff &
"";

Mgrs;·
...

P&F

Executive

Commission

Jul.

Aug.

/0

Sep.

~.

.

Oct.

/~-

Nov.

Dec.

Jan.

Feb.

Mar.

<

Apr .

05109/06

May
Jun.

The First 5 years.

2

Make ·them count.

'

FIRST 5 Strategic Direction

A

FIRST 5
SANTA ClAIIA COUNTY

0)

C

C
0
+-'

u

(])

·0
:i,_

J...

0

·+"
C

0

----'
'
'
.-' - - - '

+"

u
ro

J....

u

+"
C

+-'

-a

Annual evaluation of
strategic direction and
alignment with First 5
California.

0
·0) u
(])

ro

:i,_

+-'

U')

Funding Alignment

C

ro

C

0
·+"
ro

Research Organization
and Coordination

:::,

ro
>

w

Scopes of Work and
Evaluation allow for
monitoring of progress
toward indicators and
achievement of
outcomes

The First 5 years.
3

Make them count.

Approved 10-Year Sustainability Plan
(Updated February 10, 2006)
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Updated Feb 10, 2006
FY 2007/08

Dollars In Thou_sands

F.Y,2008/09
Pro'ection

FY 2009/10
Pro ection

FY 2010/11
Pro eotlori

FY 2011/12
Pro"ec_tion

FY 2012/13
Pro ectlo_n

FY 2013/14
Pnfectlon

F.Y 20.14/15
P~je~tloil

FY 2015/16
Projection

1. Beginning balance•

3. State_ matching
4. Other rewnue
5. Subtotal rewnue
6. Interest - Operation Fund
7. Interest· Sustainability Fund

21,667.0
3,622.4
· 302.0
25,59'1,4

21,017.0
3,024.6
302.0
24,343.6·

20,386.5
2,279.1
302.0·
22,967:6'

19,774;9
1,800.0
'302:0
21,876.9

19,181.7
1,800.0
302;0
~J,283.7

18,606.2
1,800.0
302.0
20,108:2

18,048.0
1,800.0
302.0
20;150:0

17,506.6
1,800.0
302.0
19,608.6

16,981.4
1,800:0
302.0
19,083.4

·1,143.8
,1,200.0

865.7
1,200.0

620.1
1,200.0

426'.4
1,200:0

218.0
.1,200.0

75,5,•
1,200.0

55.1
1,200.0

52.2
1,200.0

43.2
1,200.0

3,803.1
1,891.5
17;045.9
22,740.5

3,651.0
,1,815.8
16,045.9
21,512.7

3,504.9
1,743.2
15,945.9
21,194.0

3,364.7
1,673.4
15,945.9
20,984.1

:,_:-~.

8. Total rewnue
•. ~,.1

Expenses:

9. Program••
10. Administration
12. ·eonimunity lnwstments
13:Subtotal exp.

15. Total expenses
Adm In/Expense Ratio'."·

4,664.2
2,319.8,"
3_1,250.0
38,234.0

~~;;;I~~~gro ~~YJ.~\Q.t
6.2~ _

"6.1%

4,477.7
2,227.0.
28,800.0
35,504.6

6.3%

4,298.6
2,137.9,
25,525.0
31,961.5

-

.4,126\6.,
2,052.4
25;045:9
31,224.9

3,961.6
1,970.3,
. 22;045.9
27,97.7.7

fl.~t;i6J~5~ ~~im.lfil ~~i7illl~.7'i:7t
6.7%

6.6%

7.0%

8.3%

ff~~~§l~ \K4i.;~l~.1;~~ ~l~il~..Qf~ro
8.4%

8.2%

8.0%

30,941.5
Fund balarfi
eluding the sustalnabillt
d of 30 mill/on plus Interest eamed
de_s Prvu~m and·evalua _ ,
, FY06-07 Plan Is within Administratill!) Polley 1fod In compliance with GFOA guidelines.

4

..

S s. fo_wol,, ?o/

The First 5 years.

Make them count.

~,,~_

F_Y.. 2QQq-,07 FIRST 5 Total .Qpera_tio.ns._ Budget

--4-~.A
FIRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY



FIRST 5 Santa Clara County FY2006-2007 Budget
Department Code

Total

- FY05/06 ·

Budget

!Headcount(Yearend)
..
Salaries
Benefits/Taxes
.
Retirement/457
Evaluation
Trainina
6. Administrative
7. Research & Development Grant Writini:i.
8. Other Purchase Services
9. Santa Clara Countv Services
10. Travel
11. Trainino Exoenses
12. Communitv Meetino Suooort
13. Administrative· Suooort Services
14. Teiecom/Teleohone
15. Software Maintenance & Suooort
16. Maintenance

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

Controllable Expenses Total

Department Name!

FY06/07

Delta

Budget

..__ _5_.3!'._!_ __.
$3,662.5
$960.7
$600.0,
$450.0
$300.0
$250.0
$57.0
$197.3
$72.5
$59.5
$183.8
$381.8
· $61.8
$11.6
$421:8
$0.0
$0.0

$8,085.7

-$306.1

$3,356.4

$936.2
$372.6.
$700,0'

$409.4

-$24.5

-$36.8
$Hi0.0

$466.2

r

-s!

$250.0
$50.0
$59.3 $188.4
$66.5
$23.0
$90.8
$255.9.
· $30.7 .,.
$11.6
$342.4
$0.0
$0.0

_,

$7,200.0
.._,_____......

%
-11

I :=:==============
I

%!

Comments

Rightsizing the organization to support the new community approach

-8%

Reduced head count, -3:5% merit/promotion adiustment

-9%

Reduced due to lower labor costs.

17%

Add $ for Lonaitude Study and data collection svstem based on outside bids .'

-3%

$16.2

4%

-$50.0
-$200.0

-17%
-80%

Reduced benefits due to lower labor cost.

Alianed trainino contracts to meet the needs of the leamino institute.
Lower consultant cost, Audits, Translation Services, MM Billing services
Aligned the actuals(Research Dev & Grant Writing)

$2.3

4%

-$8.9
-$6.0
-$36.5
-$93.0
-$125;9
-$31.1
$0.0
-$85.41$0.0
$0.0

-5%

iT Support and Countv Counsel

-8%

Alioned travel with projected exoenditure trend.

-$885.7

5

(Unit; Dollars In Thousands)

FIRST 5 Total Operating Expense

Bascom Litioation

,.

-61%

Staff Development

-51%

Lower Office Eouipment, and lower meetinA rental reouired.

-33%

-50%
0"4

·20%

.

Lower Printina Costs

Lower headcount = lower_ Phone cost.
Computer Software
Lower furniture exoenses, No rent costs due to buildinA purchase

-

-11%

The First 5 years.
Make them count.

Apptov·ed 10-Year ·s:ustainability Plan
(Updated February 10,2006)

----

Dollars in Thousands

FI.RST 5
~ANTA CLARA COUNTY

FIRST!? Santa Clai'a~County
Updated Feb 1_0, 2006

FY 2007/08
Pro·ection

FY 2008/09,
Projection

J=Y. 2009/10

21,667.0
3,622.4
302.0
25,591.4

21,017.0
3,024.6
302.0
24,343.6

20,386.5
2,279.1
302.022,9?7.6

19,774.9
1,8_oy.o
3()2;0'
21,876.9

19,181.7
1,8qo.o_
302.0·'
21,283,7'.

18,606.2
11~9,9.o
302:0
20,708.2

18,048.0
1,800.0,
302,0
20,150.0

17,506.6
1,800.0
302.0
19,608.6

16,981.4
1,800.0
302.0
19,083.4

1,143.8
1.200.0

865.7
1,200.0

620.1
1,200.0

426.4
1,200.0

218.Q '.
1,200.0

75.5
1,200.0

55.1
1,200.0

52.2
1,200.0

43.2
1,200.0

4,664.2
2,319,8
31,250.0
38,234.0

4,477.7
2,227.0
28,800.0
35,504.6

4,298.6
2,137.9
25,525.0
31,961.5

4,126.6
2,052.4
25,045,9
31,224.9

3,961.6
1,970.3
22,045.9:
27,977.7

3,803.1
1,891.5
17:,045.9
22,740.5

3,651.0
1,815.8
16,045.9
21,512.7

3,504.9
1,743.2
15,945.9: ,21,194.0

3,364.7
1,673.4
15,945.9
20,~84.1

6.6%

7.0%

Pro"ection

_ FY 2010/11
·. Pro ection,.

FY 2011/12
Pro ection·· ,_

FY 2012/13
FY 2013/14
_Pro ectii:m . . P.rojectkin

FY 2014/15
Projection -

FY 2015/16
Pro ·ction

1. Beginning bal~nce•

Revenue:
2. Allocations
3. State ma\~hing
4. Other rewnue
5. subtotal re1,13nµe
6. Interest - Operation Fund
7. Interest~ Sustainability Fund
8. Total rewnue

Expenses:
9. Program ..
10. Administration.
)2. Community lnwstments
13. Subtotal exp.

15. Total expenses
Admin/Expense Ratio

~)f~W91 ~~141 [email protected]~ ~[Q~~fil
6.2%

6.3%

6.1%

6.7%

'

~~rr19~ ~~~1im; [email protected]@-2~] ~N'i!!19Af~
8.3%

8.4%

8.2%

8.0%

16. Ending balance•
• Book Fund balance avallable for expenses, Including the sustainability fund of $30 mil/Ioli plus Interest earned vdth Merrill Lynch
.. Includes program and evaluation expenses.
•· FYOG-07 Plan is within Adminlstrallw Policy and in compliance with ·GFOA guidelines.
.

'

'

:;

6

The First 5 years.
Make them count.

.

_

5-Year Community Investment Plan

,.4

(Approved February 10,2006)

_;g·
I'-

·FIRST 5
0

SANTA Ct.AAA COUNTY'

Dollars In Thousands

1
2
3
4
5
6
.7

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Upda~ed February 10, 2006

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & EDUCATION
STRATEGY (COUNTY WIDE)
Arts Enrichment Initiative.
Community Information/Education
Community Events & Sponsorship
Community Engagement & Awaren"'ss
Childhood Matters (Radio Program)
Children's Discovery Museum
Emergency Requests
Emerging Initiatives
Children's Health Care Initiative
E3 • CARES
.

FY05/06·

800.3
925.0
125.0
1,000.0
200'.0
1,000.0
50.0
200.0
4,519.9
3,750.0.

FY06/07

FY07/08

FY0B/09

800.0
875.0
125.0
1,000.0
175.0

600.0
125.0
1,000.0
150.0

300.0
125.0
50,0.0
125.0

50.0
100.0
4,500.0
3,750.0

50.0
75.0
4,500.0
3,750.0

50.0
50.0
3,900.0
3,750.0

F''t1,0/11

FY09/10

300.0
125.0

300.0
125.0'

100.0

100.0

50.0
50.0
50.0
50.0
9
3,900.0
3,900.0
10
3,000.0
3,000.0
00·,,~"'fi.=a·
7
~3•~.;;.,5·-:,•o·~'fQ;..,....,o.·~2"5'0'·
'18"'<:'0=r-o;,.o=,,_,r,,,w;r-.; ·s·2'~5••·o~~~"'B;;t~2'·5=0·
,;
11 r,., 1-1W·=,;,.;~:'.:,w~:,-r,;-~~1t·•'l=l"-e'···i''-1....~,,,"~~"t--'•,.,t';:,-S-""'t~""=t·,.,-:-;s;>..--qrv~~-..,,5·",.;·o'~ff:~'7f"'1·
8

t;..'19~~ .:~~g_m.mYJJ:,..AW-!..-.:.1.11~g~m-PDit. . . ~--!.U1Y~~:,>~~J2~b::Jl:.:~,?.~t~-!i;J;~.L~$,..J..

..

. .,~~-·:t.-.1-::.~d;_~-'~.:..,..:~,.:..~~t~!i1~~~~5~~;~;l~}r2t~~~~""1_f~ .

HIGH RISK STRA·TEGY (TARGETED IMPACT)

12
13
1·4
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23

Planning Grants
Power of Preschool
E3°- Professional Development
Early Learning Initiative (4 School Dist.)
High Risk Design.
Care Management/Family Court
Prenatal & Toddler HV
Early Screening Initiative:
CLA
Via
Reach Out & Read
6 Regional Partnerships

Preschool For All

2,000.0

1;0ocfo

.....

, ,
7

9,500.0

10,000.0

10,000.0

9,520.9

The First 5 years.

Make them count.

Program Selection Process regarding New Funding Requests
SANTA CLARA ·cOUNTY



During the new funding cycle period, the Commission received 6 funding
requests for a total of $2,925K.

1.

2.
3.

4.
5.
6.



Areas of Poverty Underserved in Power of Preschool
Mexican Heritage Plaza
VMC Foundation-Reach Out & Read Assessment Program
United Way (2-1-1)
Santa Clara County Social Services Agency
Public Engagement (Safe Surrender)
Happy Hollow Park & Zoo Renovation

$2,000,000
·$ " 75·,250·
$ 1'00,QOO
$ 100,0,PO.
$_

50,000
,.$~--- 600-,0.00,
. $-2,~)2~,2-50

Total--

Upon receipt of funding requests, the Joint Program & Evaluation Cqmmittees reviewed the
proposals and heard presentations from the r;eq.uestors at th~ir, Nov~mber and December 2005_
committee meetings. The Committees directed.staff to prepa_rEl.an---~nalys:i:s-and . recommen:dations·
for each proposal to be presented at the·MayCommission Budgel'.'Nfeeling. .
· ~-. •·• '._,.,,,....... •

"'1

'..

- ••

,.

~:

. . . . . . . ~~---··

• • , .....

.,...,j/... "t~

·--



Staff reviewed and analyzed each funding request to ensure proposals were in alignment with the
Community Investment Strategy-Community Engagement and High Risk Design F1Jridirtg-;:-· '"
Alloc~tions: and Strategies. In addition, staff ensured the proposa'ls did· not c·ontain duplicate
service efforts.
··



New funding requests were evaluated for funding alignment within the current approved $31,375K
Community Investment line item of the 10-Year SustainabHity Plan.
_ ,.::

8

The First 5 years.
Make th.em count.

New Funding Requests
FIRST 5

•·· -

Requestor

Requested Amount

Areas of Poverty
Underserved in Preschool
For All

$2 million annually for
5yrs

-District 4. ,Supervisor
James T. Beall, Jr.

Summary of Request

FIRST 5 Commission to
·
consider census report
data on pockets ofpoverty
and allocatl:;}, from their .. , ,
reserve, $2M annually ·for
. 5 years to fund preschool
.:spaces in the identified.
pockets of poverty within
Santa Clara .County.,
. . ·.

. • .:J.t•.•.?:?.

LJA,~.'!~
.r .. •-· ·-. ··:,·_·-

~LA.fl.,, COUNTY

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations

FIR_ST 5 has committed to a multi-year fLJ_nding
allocation based on research and data focusing on
cumulative risk factors. The
pf ejght
~umulative risk factors in a child~s life was
determined to have direct impact on the child's
ability to thrive. The Commissiop agreed tg §llf:lPPd
this,r;ese~rch amd to fund demonstratjgn sjtes
containing intervention services io a·three serviet~
mod~l.~pproach within regions where data identified
the highest number.of children
and their families
live. This approach is part ofthe sfralegic
Community Investment Plan approved by the
Commission. FJJ3$I 5 fwn~ing allocaUoos caooot
s.upport aov
t1
tbat is· riot
wjth
tt;iat 'AS'iaVilal e1-1el so~o eefil~e·,4t.
· ·

...

This funding request is not in alignment,because:
• Poverty is only one of the risk fac;;tors·examined
through FIRST S's research: Data provided by the
applicant does not prgyjde c11m11latjve risk factor
information regarding 0-5 population in, its research
analysis.
• Data provided does not identify high concentration
of ch.ildren 0a5 in particular zip code areas coupled
whh high cumulative risk factor prevalence.

-'""l

(continued p.10)

The First 5 years.
9

Make them count.

r

New Funding Requests Continued
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requester
Areas of Poverty
Underserved in Preschool
For All

. ....
,

Requested Amount

Summary of Request

--

$2 million annually for
5yrs

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations

. FIRST 5 is not funding early education spaces

,'

_,.-

without support services identified through best
practice research in either the Demonstration Sites
or FIRST 5 Regional Partnerships.
• The proposal does not contain a coordinated
regional or countywide approach ·in identifying
e'ssen.tial elements of information regarding child
care service .needs or funding
including:
.. - ..- streams,
,_... _..,.. ,., ,, _... . . ..,
number and ages of children 0-q in need of child
care services by region, invento'r:y of subsidized
~~f'{iq,Etfby t~9i9f"!, le'{el of quality of services
(eitablished by.the ·oommissign in,!t,~ir:Jy1,9s.ter· Plan
for Pbwernf Preschool Initiative) by region, facility
capacity, income eligibility criteria, eligibility waitlist
requirements, identification of providers by funding
streams and·region, utilization and currentamount
of'funding-for child care subsidized services by
region (Head Start, State Preschool, California
Department of Education Subsidized child care
con'trac:ts,. Social Services Agency C~I-WORKS
S.tages 1;11,11_1 child care funding).
.
.
~-.
· Ib.e
does oot bu1Ho _$:;m_ 0t
uncommitted funds within its ComrT)ur:ilty Investment
Plan.

,•

-District 4 ,Supervisor
James T. Beall, Jr.

.J

(continued)

:;•
..

.,

'·_.-:

.

;'".L:_

.

;.

~:~- "

;

.,,

.

.

'

',:

.,

;,,,,' '

·-f?
;

-~

..

'•

;.

(continued p.11)
'
.

,.

·,

The First· 5 years.
10

Make' them count.

..

tA
'

New Funding Requests Continued

FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor
Areas of Poverty
Underserved in
Preschool For All

Requested Amount

Summary of Request

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations
The Demonstration Sites containing the th~ee part model
will be evaluated [email protected] .a longituclinal stu.dy_ de_s.[gned to
evaluate the impact of this comprehensive, coordinated
design and the potential for expansion to other regions
within the County.

$2 million annually
for 5yrs

-District 4,
Supervisor James T.
Beall, Jr.

Recommended Actions:
Fl RST 5 staff recommends ·not funding this request for
child care spaces in the amount of $2 million dollars
annually for the next 5 years.

(continued)

t --4.

2. FIRST 5 -staff recommends funding a District 4 pilot
research stuay up to $50K. When completed, this siudy
can inform and add strategic value to couoty wide planning
efforts regarding early education needs. (rhe scope of
work for the study shall include.data fjpdings for this region,
focused on the essential elements of information which will
include, but is not limited to:
-

•Number of children 0-5 needing child care.
•SubsidizE;ld services
•Level of quality of services
•Facility capacity
•Income eligibility criteria
•Waitlist requirements
•Providers/funding streams

'--

•Utilization and current funding by subsidized
services.(Head Start, State Preschool).
(continued p.12)

The First 5 years.
11

Make them· count.

New Funding Requests Continued
SAPfTA CLAIIA COUNTY

Requestor

Requested Amount

Areas of Poverty
Underserved in Preschool
For All

$2 million annually for
5yrs

Summary of Request

--

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations
Recommended Actions cont:
this District 4
3. the information .gen~rate_d from
.
pilot study, as ·well as the applicant's area of
poverty study and other Fll~ST 5 high risk data, can
be utilized to influence policy level decisions as well
as influence legislation regarding early care and
education services·, especially income eligibility and
quality standards.
..

-District 4 ,Supervisor
James T. Beall, Jr.
(continued)

4. FIRST 5 staff recommenrl~Jbe f3 Institute
'. initiate a.partnership with the Local Early Education
Plannin~ Council.to ·conduct the District 4 12i!Sll-~
study. The, research·findings can be presented to
the•FIRST 5 Commission-, and made available to
others for us.e in their strategic planning and funding
allocations .
,.

.

The First 5 years.

12

Make them count.

New Funding Requests Continued
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor
Mexican Heritage
Plaza (MHP)

Requested Amount

1.
2.

$50,250.00
$25,000.00

Total $75,250.00

Summary of Request

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations

1. The MHP is
proposing to add a
Folklorico Music and
Movement Program
(FMMP). FMMP is
designed to provide art
and cultural exposure to
children ages 0-5 and
their families through
traditional Mariachi
Dance instruction and
exposure. (Curriculum
Development)

1. FIRST 5 currently has a funded Arts Enrichment
Initiative with funding through FY 06-07. The new Power
of Preschool Initiative (PoP), which will be launched in FY
06-07, identifies arts enrichment as a critical component
of a child's learning experience. All arts enrichment
activities will be aligned with and integrated in the Power
of Preschool Initiative.
Recommended,Action:

2. The MHP is seeking
funding for outreach and
marketing materials and
sponsorship for the July
2006 Mariachi Festival.

• Ref~r this request to the E3 Institute for possible
consideration of.this program into the Arts Enrichment
and Power of Presch-ool lnitlatives with.an- emphc!sis on
age appropriate/developmentaily'appropriate curriculum
standards designed for Pre-K as opposea:to
·
Kindergarten.
2. FIRST 5 has established guidelines for sponsorship of
community events.
Recommended Action :
• Direct Mexican Heritage Plaza to submit a request for
funding up to $5,000.00 for the Mariachi Festival under
the Guidelines for Participation in Community Events and
Sponsorships.

The First 5 years.
13

Make them count.

New Funding Requests Continued
F,IRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor

Requested Amount

Reach Out and
Read Assessment
Program (RORAP) -

$100,000.00 per year
for 3 years

VMC Foundation

Summary of Request

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations

Reach Out and Read
The proposed request is in alignment wi_th the
Assessment Program
Community Investment Stragtegy.
provides early
screening for
The Reach Out and Read Program was a pilot project
prel,iminary
supported by FIRST 5 in FY 05-06. The results of the
assessrrisen,t of
·pilot demonstrated the program was highly successful
developm~ntal.delays
ir:i.rnaking literacy promotion a staridard p'art of
and learning
pediatric primary- care; educating p·arents about the
differences.
importance of reading aloud to their children; ·and,
Physicians use books
increasing the number of pediatric referrals for
to conduct the
c:hild~en with suspected developmental delays.
screening and engage '
parents in the
Reeommended Actions:
.importance of reading
..
to their children.·:
1.
Fund
the
program
for
one year-FY 06-0_7. This
..
year
will
serve
as
a
'!transition
year" for the program
!he request is for
to
be
integrated
into
c!community~wide
screening:'~md
maintaining c:urrer:it
is
being
led
by
Uie:lnclusion
assessment
model
that
efforts and expanding
Collaborative. Transition planning 111~~fdem9nstrate
the program:
other funding sources for future sustainability.
Pediatricians will continue to refer children who
exhibit characteristics of coricerh to providers for ·
further assessment and follow-up service planning.
This process will be integrated into the-overall FIRST
5 service delivery system. In addition, the program
will need to expand its co-branding and marketing
plan.
---

The First 5 years.
14

Make them count.

New Funding Requests continued
FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor

Requested Amount

2-1-1

$100,000.00

United Way Silicon
Valley

FY 2006-2007

,

Summary of Request
2-1-1 Silicon Valley is a 24/7 nonemergency, centralized
countywide, cross discipline,
information and resource call
center for county residents. 2-1-1
Silicon Valley also-provides an
online database of resources and
services for Santa Clara County.
2.-1-1 is designed to'work similarly·
to 9-1-1 services. Thi.s request
asks for a partnership with FIRST
5 to support the planning and start
up phase of 2-·1-1 in Santa Clara
County.
The 2-1-1 anticipates launching
the first phase in the latter part ofFY 05-06 to be followed by a
public lunching in early 2007.
FY 06-07 Budget
•Start up Expenses$ 321 K
•Operational Exp
$453 K
•Capital Exp
$ 45 K
•Total Exp

$ 819 K

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations
This funding request is in alignment with the
Community Investment Strategy as follows:
• The 2-1-1 system will create a county-wide
three digit (2-1-1) operated assisted phone-in
information and referal service for families in
need of a range of Health and Human :S~rvices.
• The 2-1-1 system will also develop specialized
dptabase infprmation and referral system (with
FIRST 5 consultations) to address the unique
service needs of the prenatal through age 5
population and their families.
•This information and referal system _will support
children and families who are served by the
FIRST ·5 Full-Service Demonstration and
Community Partnership outreach ar,d se~ice
systems.
Recommended Action:
1. Fund in the amount of $100,000 for FY 06-07.
2. Evaluate partr:iership in thi~ program at the
end of the fiscal year and determine effectiveness
of integrating 2-1-1 into overall Community
Engagement Strategy.
3. Request report from United Way at end of
fiscal year regarding their ability to leverage other
sources of funding.

_,

,•

The First 5 years.
15

Make them count.

New Funding Reqwests continued

A

FIRST 5SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor
Santa Clara County
Social Services
Agency (SCCSSA)

Requested
Amount
$50,000
-one time
request

Summary of
Request

Analysis/Findings and Recommendations

SCGSSA is
requesting funding for
a public education
strategy for the .local
Safe Surrender;Baby
Project This public;:
campaigfl wot:Jld
target tt;te general
public and high risk
areas,,based on geo
mapping of the
prevalence of risk .
factors aAd combined
cumulative risks. "fhe
campaign must ·
include:·
1) Ads in e·thnic
newpapers;

The strategies proposed in the Safi~, ~urrender request ar.e ·in ·
alignment with the FIRST 5 c'ommunity Engagement and Education
Strategy in the following ways:

2) Puolic signage (e.g.
buses); a·nd,
3) Training in high
schools

• Safe Surrender messages can be incorporated into FIRST 5
website, 3 Radio shows (English, Spanish, Vietnamese), Count
Down To Kindergarten activities, newsletters, and ·ethnic newspaper
ads.
• FIRST s·Community Partnerships can distribute information and
materials and provide trainir'lg·on the SaJe-Surteflderprogram.
• The incorp'oration of the Safe Surrender programs within FIRST 5
ml!lti-year strategies will help assure the sustainability of this vital
public eduGation activities.
.,

8ecommended Acticin:
'.
1. Recommend·not funding the'.Safe Surrender Program at $50,000.
2. Incorporate th·e Safe Surrender str.~teg_ies, _training arid messages
into the overall FIRST 5 Communicatibn Plan: FIRST 5
.partner
with SCCSSA in finalizing the' pub'lic edllcation messaging, materials
'
··
··
ahd presentation formats.

will

3. Ensure that the Safe Surrender messages/curriculum are
incorporated into the,Parent W.or:~!>hops and ,Commur:iity,qf learning
. trainings.
·
·
·
·

The First 5 years..
16

Make·them count.

New Funding Requests continued

:;;.,...

_AFIRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Requestor

Carousel ProjectHappy Hollow Park
& Zoo Renovation

Requested
Amount

Up to $600,000
-One time request

Summary of Request

Analysis/Findings and Recommer:1dations

Happy Hollow Park and
Zoo is requesting
$600,000 for the
Endangered Species
·Carousel. The Carousel
will serve young people
in the community-with
interactive, educational
and creative experiences
within -~he Happy Hollow
Park and Zoo, which
serves children in San
Jose and surrounding
communities. This
project is part of a larger
capital. improvement ahd
expansion plan that
begins in early 2007.

This project is in alignment with FIRST 5's County-Wide
Community Engagement ar'la Education strategy as follows:

•The total cost of the
Happy Hollow Park &
Zoo renovation is
estimated to be $65M.
· The total cost of the
carousel is estimated to
be $900K.

1. Refer the Endangered Spec.ie~ Carousel proposal to the
Commission's January 2007, 10-Year Sustainabiiity Plan
Meeting with a recommendation that this project be funded in
the FY 07-08 buqget.

• Since 1961 Happy Hollow Pa"rk and Zoo has offered a
unique combination of enjoyable, safe and interactive
experiences for young children. ·
• Happy Hollow offers children and families in the community
access to the park and zoo through programs, events and
discount coupons. They also have partnerships with many
organizations in the-community that serve children in need.
• The park and zoo offer learning and experiential
opportunities for our youngest children that reinforce the
FIRST 5 message of the importance of the first five years.
• This partnership is an opportunity to continue to promote the
FIRST 5 messages while supporting the renovation of this
site.
Recommended Action:

2. Happy Hollow is requested to update the proposal to
include any additional funding commitments and construction
schedule, and submit the information to the Commission in
December of 2006.

The First 5 years.

17

Make them· count.

Summary of Staff Recommendatio11s regarding New Funding Requests

FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY



Recommend: funding the following in FY 2006-07
1. VMC ·Fo.tinda~fo.n (RORAP)
2.
3.

United V\(ay_J~-1-1.)
Needs Assessment Study for District 4
' '
.
·: ··•·. .. .. :.- .
. •- ". .. t,:;..._!"0~:
·
·"· · ·
· · ·
-·,r·ofal
;t. - -.

'



-

:._

}

-

·. ·

·,.; .

' ·.: .. ,);/~-.~... -

'.

$ 100,000
$ 100,000

$:

.;, .~~~§1(

50,000
250,000

.

Recommend .funding, in FY 2007-08 at the January 07 update of the
10-Year Sustai"natiH:~ty Pl~n mee.tj,Qg.

Happy Hc~tllq~--~·arq4.s,eJ i~tc;>Ject
._$; 600,000

7

'

18

.,.J.

-

The First 5 years.

Make them count.

FY 2006-07 Recommended Realignment of
Community Investment Schedule

-8

FIRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Dollars in Thousands

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Updated May 9, 2006
FY 2006/07

COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT & EDUCATION
STRATEGY (COUNTY WIDE)

Budget

1
2
3
·4
5

Arts Enrichment Initiative
Community Information/Education ·
Comm_41J{ty l;ven~ ~t~ponso_rs~_ip ...
Cori1:n,1foity;Engagement & Aw~reness
Cl1il~h.9od Matters (R~~i9 Program)
6 Chi.lcfren's Discovery Muse-~m
7 Emerg,e.ncyi,Reque~
8 Emerging Initiatives
9 Children's Health Care Initiative
10 E3 -CARES
11

800.0
500.0
125.0
1,000.0·
200.0
200.0
. 50.0,
250.0
4,500.0
3,750.0.

HIGH.RISK STRATEGY (TARGETED IMPACT)
,•

12 Pewer of, Preschool .

8,567.4
10,432.6
1,000.0

1'3 High Ri~ be~ig~;---

14 Ea:rly•.Scrtite'riin{fl'nitiative:
15
16
*. Includes New Reco~_mended Funding Requests ..
** Contracts will be negotiated not to exceed budgeted a!'l ount.

19

The Fir:st 5 y~ars.

Make them count.

Community Investments by FIRST 5 Goal Areas FY 2006-07
(Current view)

FIRST 5
SANTA C\.AAA COUNTY

.

..

Goal 1- Health care: Children are born
healthy an~ e~ren~~ ?PtlmaJ. ~ea~h
and development •·: •.. _. . ;;.-·

Goal 4- Neighborhood SUpport: nelgh-

·boi:h9ods ~nd comr:m)rilt!es are places

;wt,i!fe'ctillcfferiare·safe, neighbors are
connected,and all cultures are

\.

Goal 2- FamJlyS4pport:fclmllles pr,ovlde

safe,stable,lovlng and st_l,in,ulatlng · .: 1'
homes.

<

~.

;

"

,.._

i~eg.

>

., .

'··

.'"'

Goal s -system Change:systems are

responsive to the needs of children and
families.

Goal 3 - Early Care & Eclucatlon:chlldren
enter school fully prepared to succeed
academlcally,ernottonally,and socially.

Total.Jnv~~imen~-·-= $31,375,000
.

.

-

20

The First 5 years.
Make· them count.

.S.um. rnary
FIRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

1. · The ·FY··2006-07 Budget is in alignm~·nt witt,
-FIRST 5's VisjQ:n;r. 6":f~-$:io:n,. G,oals, O'utto.'rrie•S
· a· nd Re·s:··ear~:fi) · · ,>.'~·:.- <:···.::·: . . · - · · ··.~·
· ·
.• -

·.\.j,~ i

--1

.·,..::f i,

,

.

.

-~.... ~••:-.••:~••:•L•.;'.I,:•~•;-•
..,,•

.



'-:.~ . :~ !: ·

.'

. ·.f _.. ' ..- :·

'

;; __...

•.._

.- ·,



·..'-.



<'

·1 · :

•.

· ., :~ -~~)1~..-·
..

:,.:•



.

.'.. • .

·:"

.

'

-

. - ·.
)





;

1::!

<;

.,.

:·-·. .-:· •. -·


,....,

., ._. .-: ·,





. -.. -

•.
-~

O

d>•"' 0 •

· :r

•\

~~t-

- '-·\·.,, ..

· ·2. The FY 20:(l6-;Q7·- '~::U·d~g:~t ls W·i:t~{ri. '.the Planned
Budget a:111:Q;•U![l:fs·,ap,·proved·:•_ by J.t:ie ·Commission
at the 1o~Yea:t'.,S 1is'tai:n:a.bi1'1fy . V\l()tk·s·hop
.

Februari·11~;j0ij-ii;,, -~c:
1

-

.

'

..-

.'..

.

'

.

~-

-

.. ,

21

: ·.•·
.

>

L

.

'.

"

. ·.

The First 5 years.
Make them count.

Recommendation
· FIRST 5

5ANTA CLARA COUNTY

• Adopt the FY 2006-07 Budget.
Th.e Executive Director will negotiate community
investment contracts. Service providers and
specific contract amounts will be presented to
Personnel & Finance Committee and the
Commission for approval as negotiations are
completed.

The First 5 years.
22

Make them count.

·

,,

-.c-_·- - ' ' - - - - - - - - - - - - " - - , - - - - - - -

County of Santa Clara

Office of the Board of Supervisors

county Government center. East Wing
70 West Hedding Street, 1-0lh Flqor
San Jose, California 951 1d
(408) 299-5040

·

Fax: (~08) _299-2038 TDD 993-~272
www.Jlmbeall.org

James T. Beall. Jr.
supervisor Fourth District

DATE:·

November 18, 2005

TO:

Santa Clara County First Five

FROM:

Supervisor James T. Beall, Jr.
Santa Clara County Supervisor, -

SUBJECT:

Pockets-of Poverty Undersetved in ,Preschool'For A_ll Jnititative

RECOMMENDED ACTION
Consider Census Report and recommend allocation ofan additional $2 million annually for five years to the
Commission's Preschool For All Initiative for pockets ofpov:erty, and forward to the January 2006 First Five
Commission with favorable recommendation.
REASON FOR RECOMMENDATION
On June 21, 2005 the Board of Supervisors directed administration to dev~loo -poverty data by Supervisorial
district using Census 2000 d.ata. The data was to focus on those individuals in poverty'that may be eligible or
in need of certain services including Senior Nutrition Program, First Five Commission programs and other
need-based family services. The intent of the referral was to determine whether the County's current service
delivery system was adequately providing services to individuals residing in "pockets of poverty" and if not,
how do we realign services to ensur~ the County serves all residents in need.
·
On September 27, 2005, the Board of Supervisors considered the Census report back. The report showed that
23% of all families live in poverty in the county._ Of the 400,000 families_living in Santa Clara County,
93,000 have incomes below $45,000 per year.
Additionally, the report demonstrated that there are more poverty concentrations throughout Santa Clara
County and poverty was more widely distributed than previously thought.
This data demonstrates that allocating resources based on zip code versus census blo9k analyst§ results in a
significant number ofindividuals in need not having access to quality
that could enrich their hves.

programs

Acid Fcee Paper

* ....

0

We are thvare that pov:erty represents one of p risk factors used to determine how to-allocate fonds for the
Preschool-For All Initiative. Faced with the new evidence that zip code analysis· resuits ooder serving a ·
}Mge number.-9f poorchildre..n..and families we believe it is ~ical..ful:..t-he-GQmmission reconsider their
funding recommendations _and allocate an additional $2 million ann.ually-foi:-fwe-year-s-te--the Commission's
·····
·
Preschool For All Initiative for pockets of poverty.

in

Given ~irs.t_t_iye' s mission is to serve all children, we think the Commission has an opportunity to :use
s~me.. the money set a side in their reserve to expand reschool more uitably. The Commission's
Presc oo p an as curren y propose spends the majority of the $42 million in one geographic location, the
6 zip codes in Component C. $42 million is a significant porti<;m of the total First"Five revenue.

of

The Census report demonstrates that analysis must be more refined. The Census Study is attached for your
review. We request you forward th_e ·Census Report and our recommendation to the neqessary Sub
Committees in order to be considered by the-full Commission in January.

.

I have requested Administration to use this data to review how and wn.ere services are provicled to low
income families and seniors. Currently, the Department of Aging and Adult Services is re-examining how
services to seniors are allocated and are will provide recommendations to the. Children, Seniors and Families.· ·
'Committee in January. Recommendations will examine ways to address underserved areas in the County.

-~ ... -. .

County of Santa Clara
Dt'pilnfll{'nt ol Planning an<! Developfnent


l 'l,1n11ing Offi<

t ·.1>11111, <,,,,·,·n11111·111 < .1·111<·r. l:a.s1 \Vlng. ,1l1 l'luor
--:;1f} !11~r· ( 1ilih1n:1d\l ....,11c1.1~·<,;\
, \l 1g: .! 1 , 4 ·~,·;·i·(, 1 , " 1-u 1H1 ~~~K·q 1nH

\·\· ,, ,\ ··••. ·, ·1 ii( ,r II w 1.:.: ., ,r .k;

---······•·············-----------

TO:

CLERK OF THE BOARD

FROM:

~1.ktV
MICHAEL LOPEZ, INTERIM MANAGER
PLANNING OFFICE

DATE:

SEPTEMBER 27. 2005

RE:

CORRECTED ATTACHMENT,
ITEM #54, ATTACHMENT 1
REPORT BACK ON REFERRAL REGARDING U.S. CENSUS
INFORMATION FOR P.EOPLE IN POVERTY BY SUPERVISORIAL
DISTRICT

Attached is a corrected Attachment I, Memorandum from Planning Office. to the above

t.ransmittal.

When the statistics were exported into Word fo?:mat, tl~e migration distorted the infom1ation. In
Table B of all numbered tables. The new attachment includes the appropriate corrections.

I\• ,,ml 'll ~llpt·n·bur~'. l l011clkl l'. ();a~c. niill"l\',\ :\IVc,rnflo !"'Cl(:' 1\·ld lll!4il l,llllt·S I' l"k,tll. Ir. Lil. K111s;;
I. :rn Ill(\' l::-:l'c"llli\•1.·· I 'I 'II -r 1... 111r;1s. Ir.

BOS Agenda Date :September 27, 2005

County of Santa Clara
Department of Planning and Developmen~,-,
Planning Office

PLN02 092705
Pr~pared by: Steven Golden
Planner III
·Reviewed by: Jody Hall Esser
Interim Director' of ·.
PJanning and
Devefopmerit
DATE:

September 27, 2005

TO:

Board of Supervisors

FROM:

.·7}'~~-{:_~/
Jody Hall Esser
·Interim Director ofPl~ning _and Development .
'

'

SUBJECT: Report back on referral regru;d_ing U.S. Censu.s information for people.in poverty.
·by Supervisorial District

RECOMMENDED ACTION,
Under advisement from June 21, 2005 (Item No. 26): Accept report relating to people in
poverty data estimated from the U.S. Census with a particular focus on children, seniors, and
families in poverty.

FISCAL IMPLICATIONS

Board of Supervisors: Donald F. Gage, Blanca Alvarado, Pete McHugh, Jim Be~ll. Liz Kniss
County Executive: Peter Kutras Jr.
·

1

BOS Agenda Date :September 27, 2005

No impact to the General Fund as a result of this action.

CQNfRA;cT HISTORY


~

• .• '•,._

I .•••

.

Notapplici1;>1e.

-



REASONS FOR RECOMMENDATION
••

>

-



• .-._

' ..

On June 21, 2005 the Board of Supervisors directed administration to develop poverty data by
supervisorial district using Census 2000 data. The data was to focus on those individuals in
poverty that may :·be eligible for certain• need-based services including services provided by
the Senior Nutrition Program, First Five Commission, and other need-based family services.
The original request- was for Districts Four and Five, however, the request was expanded to
develop the data for all .s~pervisorial districts. On July 28, 2005 an off-agenda memorandum
was sent to the Bo~cl of Supervisors (Bo~d) requesting a time extension to the normal 45 day
response perioq to report back to the Board because of the significant amount of time required
to fulfill the request and other extraneous circumstances. This transmittal is in response to the
Board of Supervisor's request.

BACKGROUND
Subsequent to receipt of the June 21, 2005 directive, District 4 staff. offered some clarification
of the Census 2000 data which would best reflect the eligibility criteria fot the identified ·· ·
social service programs. Previously, the Planning Office developed a data.report for the
Children Seniors, and Families Committee (C$FC) (Attachment 4: February '16,.2005, Item
No. 9) and a similar methodology w·as used in this report. ''the main issue in developing
poverty data for supervisorial districts is that the supervisor districts were created by
assembling· Censl;ls ·Blo~ks and ·the U.S. Census Bureau d0es not make poverty data available
at this geographic level. The data is available at ,larger levels of geography and -therefore,
supervisor district boundaries are not entirely coincident with these larger geographic areas. It
was determined that some of the Census poverty data is available at the Block Group
geographic level, however, in some cases the -supervisor district boundarie~ split .these'·
geographic areas.
1



"Estimating Methodology"
The· Planning Office used a similar methodology that was developed for the CSFC, however,
Census Block Groups were used in this analysis (Census Tracts Were_,used in th_e·previous :

Board ofSupervisors: Donald F. Gage, Blanca Alvarado, Pete-McH\rgh,j,ir:n Beall,UzKniss
County Executive: Peter Kutras Jr.

2

BOS Agenda Date :September 27, 2005

analysis). The attached.September 27; 2005 memorandum-(Attachment 1}.from Steven
Golden, Associate_Planner, describes the "estimating methodology,"'in inoFe-detail.
Summary of Data
The values reported are only an.estill}ation based oii·the·.,methodology used. It is possiblethat
the technique used to assign data amongst split Block Groups does not accurately represent
the actual distribution of individuals for e~ch demographic ciit~~en_aµaJ.yzed:because f:her~:is
1mrheasurable uncertainty in·the level of correlation bet:ween total:popui.ation a)).d each
. demographfo crit~riqn ~rialvzecf. Lotal characteristics ·of°heighborhoods
communitfos play
a key role arid could have a significant effect on how concentrated or dispersed the~e
populat~ons are. For these reasons, ranges are also being reported, which refl.eet the actual.
range of the number.of individuals in each supervisorialdistrict based on the data analyzed.

and-

In addition, some of the demographics reported are base.d on, the numb~r of families. Since the
Block Groups were split using population ·data, it is possible that the splhting might result in
different values.if the ·splitting methodoiogy used the· proportional humbe~·o{families rather
than population totals. Because of the time restraiµts, this a:q.alys~s was not completed.
However, it is believed th~ differertce would 116t likely be significant. ..
The number of individuals with income to poverty ratio of of less than 1.99 and families with
family income of less than $4~,00Q are reporte~ to estimate the nµmberofin~ividuals or
families that might be eligible for need-based services. One of the criteria for some
. need-based services is having a family income of less than 300% of the federal poverty limit.
This measure is not directly reported in Census 2000, therefore, the two estimates reported
were used to assist in estimating this-measure. The income limit of $45,000 was derived by
calculating the average of the 300% federal poverty limit for a three- and four-person family
and rounded to the nearest income level as reported in Census 2000.
For a summary of the estimated dated, see the attached memorand~m from Steven Golden,
Associate Planner.
Mapping
In addition to the data summary, the Board requested maps be developed comparing areas of
poverty using Census geographies to where senior nutrition sites are located and locations

Board ofSupervisors: Donald F. Gage, Blanca Alvarado, Pete McHugh,Jim Beall, Liz Kniss
Count:r Executive: Peter Kutras Jr.

3

BOS Agenda Date :September 27, 2005

where services to children are ·provided -through, the First Five Commission. These maps have
been developed .and .are inGluded as .an attachment to this transmittal (Attadirnents 2 & 3).

CONSEQUENCES OF NEGATIVE ACTION
This report will not be used for the purposed of ev:aluating,services.

STEPS FOLLOWING APPROVAL
The Clerk of the Hoard
.

will file. ;md m~intain a. copy of this report.
'

·. ·..

.

'.

.ATTACHMENTS
• Attachment 1: Memorandum from Planning Office
• Attachme~t 2: Map of Adults 65 Years and Qld~i; 1nioverty by Blpck Group witµ .
. Senior Nutriti,:m _S~tes (9riginal _m~p on file wjth the/:;lerk .of the Board}
•,

'

'

'

.

.

'

• Attachment 3: Map ~f Clrildre~ tess·Than 5 Y ~ars. Qldjµ :P,oy~rty by Block Group .with
First Five Commission Service Locations (original map on file ·with the Clerk of the
Board)
•·Attachment 4: CSFC Transmittal, February 16, 2005, Item 9
.

. .

. . .

·. .

Board of Supervisors: Donald F. Gage, Blanca Alvarado, ·Pete McHugh, Jim Beall, Liz Kniss
County Executive: Peter Kutras Jr.

4

DATE:

September 27, 2005

TO:

Board of Supervisors

FROM:

Steven Golden,
Planner Ill, Planning Office
. Response toJ3oard Request for Census Data from June 21, 2005

RE:

,1

On June 21, 2005, the Board of Supervisors requested that poverty related data based on Census
2000 information be developed for Supervisor Districts Four and Five. Subsequently, the
referral was expanded to include all supervisorial districts. ·Wis data was to focus on irt'dividuals
that may be eligible for need based services with a focus on seniors, children,,and families that
may receive assistan.ce throughJJ:ie:$enior,Nutrition Program·.orthe First:FiveCo~issjon. The
following memo describes the methodology of estimating the data by,supetvisoifal district.
.•·

'

"Estimating· lV.fethodolog'y"

,

.

(This is similar to the memo submitted to the Children Seniors and Families Committee on February 16, 2005)
.

.

-~r

Supervisorial Districts were previously ·created through the Redistricting·Pro'gram that occurred
in
1. Th~s~ distrids 'Yei~ geat~d
3SSFqtOlin,$;9~~~µs,]jld,cks
esta~iishiµg boundaries
comc1dentw~th Census Block boJn;!d~es~ llowe:v:et, the U.S .. Census·Bureaudoesnot:release
poverty based data at the Census Block g~ographical level. The Board··ofSupervisois;has
requested to use the smallest level of geography possible to report the data by s~pervis,orial
district. Sort:te poyerty based_ data'.ts·[email protected] at the Censµs.·_.atqck Orp:qp)evel. Thi.a':v:ailable
Census data,at the Blo,ck Oroup leyel was used; but notall of tlie 1OW total Block Group
boundaries are coincident-with supervisorial-district boundaries (i.e. superi'isoriaTdistricts· split a'
number of Block Group ate~s ).' C<m~eq"µe1,1tly~ the .cJata. had to be estiIJ,iaied using .the. most
practical and appropriate nieth,od available. ·the derived method. follows:

!O?

.a~if

• . For those Block Groups.that were entirely located in a particular supervisorial district,
100% of the data went to that pl:lrticular district. .,
• There ,;,,ere a total or'69 split Block Groups between two supervisorial distri.cts. ~re
were 3 categories for estimating data for-these Block Groups as follmvs·
·
o -WO%"of total population- For 24 of these Block Groups, one section _of the split
Block Group had 100% of the total population, therefore'100%·ofth_e· data was
assigned to the supervisorial district containing the popul~tion.·
o >90% of total population - 20 Block ·Groups were split where ·>90% of the total
population were located in one section of the split Block Group. In these cases,
all of the data was assigned to the Supervisorial District containing the portion of
the Block Group that had >90% of the population.
.
o <90% of total population-25 Block Groups were split where <90% of the total
population were located iil'either section of the split Block Group. In these cases
·the· dat~ was assigned to each supefyis.oriJi:l' district accotqirigJo the percentage of
total population fo(that section of the Block Group.


1,

,



'f

.

·



· .,.

.

.' '

Data was obtained from Summary File 3 (sample population), 2000 Census, U.S. Census Bureau
using the Bureau's online database, American FactFinder.
Poverty Definition
The Census Bureau uses the federal government's official poverty definition. The Office of
Management and Budget's (OMB's) Directive 14 prescribes this definition as;the official poverty
measure for federal agencies to use in their statistical work. The following is from the U.S.
Census Bureau's website:
.'

.

Mow Poverty Status is Determin,d
The poverty statl!S of;families and ·unrelated individuals' in_ 1999 was det~rmin_~d using M3 _thr.eshqlds .
· (income cutoffs)'arrariged in·a twodimensional·matri~'. The matrix 2dnsists_offamily size'(ffoin 1
person to 9 or.moreipeople) cross-:elassified by ·presence .and im..imber of family members under 1!l ··
years old (from no children present to 8 or more children present). Unrelated individuals and 2-person
families were further differentiated by the age of the reference person (RP) (uf)der 65 years old and 65
years old and over).
·
·
·
To determine a person's poverty status, one compares the person's total family income with the
poverty thresh<,>lg.appropriate fqr. that person's family size and cqmposition (see·table below). If the
totai income pf that p_erson's family j~ less thanJhe threshold appropriate for that family, th!=)n the .
person considereci·poor, together with:·every' member cif his orher family. If a person is not living
wiU1 -anyone- related _by birth; marriage, or adoption, then the person's own income is compared with
his
n,er P,ovirty thtesnold. _- ··
.
.
' • . .
·
·

as·

·or

Weighted av_erage thre~~old~. Ever1
thoughJhe
officic:il.
~overt~
dat~ are.based on the 48 thr~sholds
J,.

,, ··,
,1
'
arranged by family size and ·number of·cfiildren within the family, "data users often want to get an idea
9f;thei "average~ threshold for. given'family size. The weighted average thresholds- provide that .
summary. They..ar~,IIVeighted average~ b~use for any.given family size,·families with a certain
number of childrei:i. may be more or le~s common t))an families with a different number 9f children. In
either words, among 3-person families, there are ·more familiei with' two adults and one. child_ than
families with three adults. To getthe weighted· average threshold for familfes 'ot a particular slze,
multiply each threshold by the number of families for whom that threshold applies; then add up those
products, and divide by the total number of families who are of that family size.
•• _

'

,_.,,.



··1

Ji'

a





-



For example, for 3-person families, 1999 weighted thresholds were calculated in the following way using
information from the 2000 .Current Population Survey: .
·
··
Family type -

Number of
.families.

No'children (three adults)
· · One child (tw~ adults) •

5;213

Two. children (one adult)

· 2;656 .

Totals

16,077

Th"reshold

*

8,208

$13,032 = $67,935,816
$13,410 = $110,099,280

*

$1·3,423 = $35,ey51,488
$21'3,656,584_

Source: Current Population Survey, March 2000.
Dividing-~?13;65!;>,?84 by 16,077 (tt,e total numberot.3-person families) yields $13,290, the weighted
average threshol_d for 3-person families. Please not~ that the thresholds are weighted not just by the
number of poor families, but by all families for which the thresholds apply: the thresholds are used to
determine which families are at or above poverty, as well as below poverty.

lndividµa1$ for who'!' poyerty st11,u~
is. d~termined. Poverty .status was determir:ied for all people
1
except institutionalized people, p~op1e· in military group quarters, people in college dormitpries, and
unrelated ifldividuais under 15
old: l'hese groups also were excluded from the humerafor and
denominator when calculating poverty rates; They ar¢ considered:neither "po9r't nor "nonpoor.'.' ·

y~ars

Spe~ified poverty le:vels. For v~rious reas,ops, tt-) 7 offic!al. pov~rfy. definition does not satisfy all th,e
needs of data users. Therefore, some of the data.reflect the number of people bel9w. different
percentages ofthe poverty levelilTtie•se specifiedp6verty levels ·are obtained'by f!\ultiplying the official
thresholds by the apprqpriate fac;tor ..For: ei<ample, the average income.cut0ff'at 125' perc;ent of the ·
poverty level was.$21,286 ($11,q29 x 1.25) in 1999 fodamily of four people..
. ·
..
Poverty Threshold~ ,in 1999 by-Size ,of Family and Number of Related Childr:en-Und,e~ 18 "i'e.ai-s

Old ·,.

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

,

(Dollars) ..

Summary of Data
The values reported are only an estimation based on the methodology used. It is possible that the
technique used to assign ·data amongst split Biock Groups·does not accurately n~pre~ent the
·
actual distribution of individuals for each demograpliic criteri9µ an~lyzed because there is ·
immeasurable uncertainty in the level of correlation between total population and each
demographic criterion analyzed. Local characteristics of neighborhoods and communities play a
key role and could have a significant effect on how concentrated or dispersed these populations
are. For these reasons, ranges are also being reported, which reflect the actual range of the
number of individuals in each supervisorial district based on the data analyzed.

In addition, some of the demographics reported are basedon the number of families. Since the
Block Groups were split using population data, ·it is ·possible that the splitting might result in

differentvalues if the splitting inethodology lised·thepropqrtfonal num~er of families rather than
population totajs. Because ofth,~·time'restrai_nt~, this.~nalysi~:was not completed. ·However, it is
believed the differencewouh:i.not likely be significant.
The number ~fin&viduals with inco!ife to poverty_ ratio of <l:99 1 and families with family
income ~$45,0P0 arii reported' to estimate ~he ·number of indi\'.iduais pr familjes that might be
eligible for need based· services. One of the criteria for some-need based services is having a
family income <300% of the federal poverty limit. This measure is not directly reported in
Census 2000, therefore, the two estimates rep9rted .were used to a~sist in estimating this measure.
The incbme limit of$45,000 was derived by calculathig the average orthe 300% federal poverty
limit for a 3- and 4-person family 2 and rounded to the nearest income level as reported-in-Census
2000.
Notes (For all table_s):
1. As· calculated using the "Estimating Methodology"
2. Population for whom poverty status is determined
Table 1A. Individuals with Income to Povertv Ratio. of <1.99·

District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
!Total

Total
Population 1•2
329,595
324,122
331,028
337,499
331,288
1,653,532

ltidividuals With
Income to Poverty
Ratio of <1.99 1
47,604
106,192
48,200
58,028
_36,71}4

I_

296,808

Percent of Individuals
with Income to Poverty
Ratio of <1.~9
16.0%
35.8% .,.
16.2%
19:6%
12.4%
100%

Table 1-B.

District 1
District2
District 3
District 4
District 5

Range: Total
Population 1 •2
86,322
89,032
88,680
89,854,
77,425 J--!• 79,616
·70,543
.74·,573
72,660 ,-- 74;404

-

-

Range: Individuals with
Income to Poverty Ratio
of <1.99 1
27,127
26,028
24,018
24,624
24,563
- '"24,959
32,841
34,889
42,731
44;~l11

-

·I.

1
2

1

This is the highest income to pdverty rati9 reported in Census 200() dat~.
The average'family size in Santa Clara County is'3.4l.
· ·

Table2A. Families with Familv lrncome <$45 000

District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
!Total

Total Families
84,984
64,469
78,221
84,697
87,394

1

Percent of ·Families
Familia~ w/Fa~ily w/Family
1
lncome:~.$45,000 ..
<$45,0QO .. :
. 17.5%
16,~35
25,0~4-...~...-- _____ , ___,26.•9.%...,__ _
17.4o/o

.ln~or;ne ;

· -·16,226.

.

21,954
13,537. '·

23.6%
14.5% · ·
100% ·

93,116 . ·

399,765.

Table 2B.

District .1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5

Range: Fam.ilies w/Family·

1

Range: Total Families
340,074.
318,739
319,512
329,827
322,642
342,454
318,913
348,988
324,254
342,059

-

1

Income <$45;ooo
46,878
4~;735
105,474'
107,421
46,781
49;89,3
55,280
59,30,5
36,045
37;842_

-

-

Table 3A. Families in Poverty with children <:5,years ,okt(can
imclude. familie.s
with .olcler
....
. i:·;,.
children) and Families with childret1 <;18 vears~okf
,.,;"-,"''

I

Total

District 1
District 2
District 3
District4
District 5
!Total

Families1
84,984
64,469
78,221
84,697
87,394

Families with
Familie.s.with
Percent of-Families
Percent of Families
Children <5yrs1 in with Children <5yrs Children ~<1·8yrs1 . with Children <1
·in Poverty .
.
.,
Poverty
..in Poverty
in Poverty.
''
1,110
2,547
..15.6%
17.2%
.,
2,876
· · 40.5%
5,395
36:4%
1,101
15.5%
2,356
15.'9%
.... ···-··-· ,...
1,348
19;0%
2,702 "
18.2%
"
12.4%,
1,841
661
9.3%
:

Byrs ·

:

I 399,765 I

7,096

I

·,•

100%

14,841

100,%

Table 3B
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5

Range: Total Families1
82,071
87,781
-:63,366
65:,915
80,997 .
76,161
79,673
87,717
85,545
90,304

-

·:Range: Fami_lies w/<3hilci.r~n.
<5yrs1 :in. Poverty
1,095
1,127
2,854
2,913
1,055
1,157"
1,380 .
1;261
643
707

-

Range: Families w/Childreri ,.
<18yrs 1 in P6verty
;
·2,508
- : 2,595
5,368
5,462 .· ..
2,476
2,256
2,792
2,512
1,782
1,931
-

-

-

Table 4A. Children <5 vears old ih ooverti·
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
!Total

Total Children Chilcir¢n <5 years in · ·Percent of ~bildren
'., 1 ..
<.5 years 1
Poverty · .- .. · <:5 years in 'P.overty
. 1,55'6
16.4%
23,821
42.5%
25,990
4,029 .. :.
, ~t--··
1 385 ,, .. -"
14.6%
23,865
22,837
1,695
17.9%
812
8.6%
19,417
115,930

9,477

r

100%

Table4B.
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5

· Range: Children <5
Range: Total Children .
1
,·.
<5 years 1
. . in.Poverty
I•
82,071
87,781
16,100
- ' 16\722
65,915'
24,806
63,366
2s:A63
16;783 ·.
· 15,817
76,161
80;997
2:i,520
79,673
87,717
20,826
1
85,545
13;963
90;-~0-4:" 13,232

-

-

-

-

-

Table -·5A.
Children ,<18:.vears:,oJa.in bm1ertv
.

,'Percent of
"
Total Children
Children <18
Children <18 years
c::;t8 years 1 years i~;PO\erty1
inPo\erty
i
District 1 .
89;032
6,237
17.1%
District 2
89,854
15',~21 ·
. 41.9%
. District 3
79,616
5,474
15.0%
District 4
5,848
16.0%
74,57~
District 5
74,404
3,669
10.0%
''
!

Total

407,479

.. '36,549

100%
•'

Table 5B'
District 1
pistri~t.i ·
District 3
District 4
District 5

Range: Total Children
<·18-years1
. 2,508.
2,595
5,462
5;36.8.
2,256
2,476
2,512
2,792
1,782
1,931

-

Range: Children

".

:< 18 vears in Poverty1

1,095
. 2,854
1,055
1,261
643

-

-..

1,110
2,876
1,101,
1,348.· '
661

Table 6A. Seniors 65 vears and older in Povertv
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5
!Total

Total Seniors
1
65yrs+
27,127
24,624
24,959
34,889
42,731

Senior$ 65yrs+ in
Poverty
1,373
2,726
1,552
2,418
1,773

Percent of Seniors
65yrs+ in Poverty
14.0%
27.7%
15.8%
24.6%
18.0%

154,330

9,842

100%

1

Table 6B
District 1
District 2
District 3
District 4
District 5

RanQe: Total Seniors 65yrs+ 1
82,071
84;984
63,366
64,469
76,161
78,221
79,673
84,697
85,545
87,394

-

-

Range: Seniors 65yrs+
in Poverty1
2,508
2,547
5,368
5,395
2,256
2;356
2,512
2,702
1,782
1,841

-

____ ...... ..s .............- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - · · - · - · -

------~---·-···-- .

."-:-.·-

m
Block Groups

•:·1

% of Adults 65 Years and Older in Pave

1, ...... ?i o. s%

:

la >5-10%

8>10-.20%.
-->20-40%

->40-100%

C:J Supervisor District Boundaiy

----------1.5

3

6

12

9

Mttes

Adults 65 Years and Older in Poverty by Block Group
Nutrition' Progra~ Sites . . ..

;@iirfsenic,r

,!,!;i·~·?, ·•:c-.·· :· :,··.

.,: • • ·

·



.. -.-..

.

:

...

·:.: ..

.

:;;tfi:
--~----··.

. ~t. ·.

Block Group wfoAdults 65-t- Years

0

....

· •·

·•

· ·

·

J.

•,•

.·:.'.

Item 4

FlR$T 5 S~;nt~_,Cl_c3.ra County
· . ·Joint Meeting,of.
Program· and e:valuatfo-r1 Com,rnittees

FIRST 5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Meeting Date:
Action:

January 18, 2006

X

Selection Process:

Submitted By:

Barbara Bernard, Training Director

Discussion:
RFP

RFQ

_ _ Sole Source _ _ Not Applicable _X_ _

TITLE:
Santa Clara County Safely Surrendered Baby Project
RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Accept the Santa Clara County Safely Surrendered Baby Project Letter of Inquiry and refer
to staff to review in preparation for the Commission's 2006 Budget Workshop.
SUMMARY OF REQUEST:
Santa Clara County Social Services Agency is requesting $50,000 for a one year period to
fund a public education strategy regarding the local Safely Surrendered Baby Project. The
funding for this pubic educati'on strategy will focus in three areas: 1) $15,000 will be used
for advertising in targeted ethnic media publications that reflect County demographics, 2)
$15,000 for interior and exterior bus signage, and 3) $20,000 will be expended for junior
and senior high school personnel training. This training is geared to equip teachers and
other school personnel with information on what to do when they suspect a student is
pregnant and to better understand and respond to the young's women's fears.
California's Safely Surrendered Baby Law (also known as Safe Haven Law) allows a parent
or person with lawful custody to legally and confidentially surrender a baby to a Safe Haven
site without fear of arrest or prosecution for child abandonment, provided the child has not
been abused. Not everyone in Santa Clara County is aware of the alternative as last year
four infants were found discarded in this County, three of whom were deceased.
BACKGROUND:
In 2004, FIRST 5 Santa Clara County joined Santa Clara County government, along with
representatives from cities, fire departments, and other governmental agencies, faith-based
organizations, community-based organizations and the community at large, in participating
on the Santa Clara County Safe Haven Task Force. In addition, FIRST 5 partnered· with ·
Santa Clara County Public Health Department in distributing literature regarding the Safe
Haven Law.
FISCAL IMPACT:
There are not fiscal implications at this time. The proposal will be considered by the
Commission at their 2006 Budget Workshop.

ATTACHMENTS:

A. Letter to Jolene Smith'from G·~ebt·Louis•~ Pl~lm dated December 21, 2005
B. Letter of Inquiry for FIRST 5 Santa Clara C0unty-funding for the Santa Clara County
Safely Surrendere~l:B~by; Project,dat~d D~~ember 21., 2005:

county of Santa Clara
Social Services Agency

333 West Julian Street
San Jose, cauromia 95 l 10-2335

December 21, 2005

Item 4
Attachment A

flC'J)D£c21

zoos·

Ms. Jolene Smith
Executive Director
First 5 Santa Clara County
4000 Moorpark Avenue, Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95117
Dear Ms. Smith,
On behalf of the Santa Clara County Social Services Agency, I am pleased to submit the
·enclosed Letter of Intent requesting funding for a public education campaign to raise
awareness in the community about the Safe Surrender Baby alternative to infant
abandonment. As you are aware, California law allows mothers to surrender their infants
at a hospital emergency room, or local fire station, no questions asked, if they feel that
they are unable to care for their child. This law was enacted to prevent the needless
abandonment of babies, in dumpsters, public restrooms, and other inappropriate places,
which often results in the child's death. The County has made a concerted effort to raise
awareness of the law in the community, through press conferences, media releases,
distribution of over 60,000 posters, brochures and flyers. In this Letter of Intent, we are
seeking funding to enhance this education campaign, through the use of advertisements in
ethnic media, bus/public transit signage, and distribution of information kits for teachers,
school administration, and other community organizations.
It is my understanding that Letters of Intent are being accepted through the end of the
month. In the event that you require additional information or have specific feedback
about the enclosed letter of intent, I would appre~iate you calling our grant writer, Ms.
Jean McCorquodale, at 259-4740, as I will be out of the office and unavailable until
January 3, 2005. After that date, I will be available to discuss the funding request at your
convemence.
Sincerely,

Greta Louise Helm, Director
Government Relations and Planning
Board or supervisors: Donald F. Gage, Blanca Alvarado, Pete McHugh, James T. Beall, Jr.• Liz Kniss
Acting county EXecutive: Peter Kutras, Jr.

S010

RfC7J D£

LEITER OF INQUIRY FOR FIRSTS SANTA CLARA COUNTY FUNDING C2 J 2005
FOR THE SANTA CLARA COUNTY SAFELY SURRENDEREH BABY PROJECT
.

Item 4
Attachment B

Contact Information

Will Lightbourne, Director, Santa Clara County Social Services Agency
Greta Helm, Director, Governmental Relations and Planning, S~ta Clara County Social Services· Agency

333 W. Julian Street1 San Jose, CA 95110-2335; Phone (408) 491-6750; Fax 975-4525: E~l [email protected]

a) Description .of the proposal. Funding is, requ~sted to ~elp preyent tlle-needless death _Qf baWes _through
abandonment. People working in the,field estimate that 57 babies are d~serted each day throt:Jghout the
country in dumpsters, parking lots, ditches,. pablic restrooms and otp.er perilous places. Last.year, four
infants-were found discarde~ in Santa Cl~~ County,- three of whom 'Y~re deceased. How many more
suffered this cruel fate? One;researcher has said, "There.is little reason.to-believe. that ev:en a small
· ··
percentage Qf the cases are discovered."
Babies are abandone_q.fgr _a nuµi.per of reaso:ns,-including desperation, fear,..is.9.\atiqn,.rape, _shame, poverty,
mental illness, an<;l addiption. In respo~se to this tragedy, California is,.one of 48 states.th~t provides a safe
alternative to p~dlous abandonment. California's.Safely Surrendered Baby Law (also known as the Safe
Haven Law) allows a parent or person with lawful custody to legally and confidentially surrender a baby to
a Safe Haven site without fear of arrest or 'prosecutioµ for child abandonment, provided the·child has not
been abused. Unfortunately, not everyone in the community is aware that this ·alternative ·exists·.
As with other public health issues, an intense local public education is critical to effectively-.~ddress child·
abandonment. However, printed materials alone have not demonstrated sufficient effectiveness. Santa
Clara County Social Services and Public Health staff m,.embers have _distributed more than 60,000 posters,
brochures and information cards describing safe surr~nder options. ,.Materials have been posted in libraries,
parks, health clinics, county buil4ings, and ma~y other sites. In addition, staff has given a number of public
presentations, has provided ·training on the protocol, and:assistea;-with press ·conferences to increase pablic
awareness. Sadly, however, more babies continue to
abandoned each year than
safely sutrencleied.

oe

ate

Moreover, these materials do not contai~ criticalJy impoltant local safe surrender site information. fu Santa
Clara County, in addition to emergency rooms as_ provided, by State law, aU 95 fire stations .are Safe Haven
sites and 911 will arrange for American Medical Response (AMR) to transport a surrendered baby to the
nearest hospital in situations whe~e a parent is afraid or unable to deliver the:child in person ..
Research indi~ates that infant abandonment occurs-most freqµently among desperate young, single
mothers. A study of cases over a seven-year. period fqund the vast majori~y of perpetrat,ors liVy either with
their parent(s), guardian(s), or other relatives. Virtually none were married or lived with their male partners,
and virtually all lacked independent fin~cial resources. An even more fundamental similarity- among cases
is silence andOisolation dupng pregnahqy. Very few told their families or friends that th:ey were-pregnant.
Many of the othet women and girls who did disclose· their pregnancie·s did not disclose them to people with
whom they were intimate, such as their parents, relatives, friends; or male partners; .
With this in mind, Santa Clara County Safe Haven Task Force subcommittee worked to devise a p:ublic
education strategy concerning local options for the safe and anonymous,surrender of infants amongjunior
and senior high school students. As a result, a pilot training will begin at three middle schools and four
high schools this coming spring semester. A trajning video (DVD format) has been developed by the
subco~ttee and produced through the in-kind contribution of the San Jose Police Department.
It is recognized, however, that further support is needed for this crit~cally important educational effort. By
virtue of pregnancy, a teenage girl is not miracµl_ously transfonp.ed into a ,:nature woman, a'Yare of her
alternatives and able to make compreh~nsive, long-term plans for the pregnancy and beyond. At the
individual. level, :the girls. invc:,lved typi~~ly possess so little :self-e~teem, that they are incapable of acting to
protect themselves. Their insecurity al~ost certainly contributes to their becoming pregnant iq. the first
place,_ and jt leads to their paralysis onc.e pregnant. Regrettably, the literature is rife with examples of the
many missed opportunities for intervention in cases studied of abandoned or killed newborns.
·
1

REC'D DEC 2 i ·2005

.Therefore, the.proposed project will provide teachers and·other school personnel with training,on what to
do when they suspect a studen.tds pregnant and to better understand and respond to the you,ig wom~n•s
fears and the p~ents' frequent denial. Again, studies have shown examples of teachers, counselors and
school nurses ~owing or suspecting that a teen was pregnant but assuming that the family was making
appropriate plans. In other instances when questioned, teachers have revealed that.they simply didn't
know how to approach the subject or what to say.
The project also will insure that the safe-surrender message receives repetition and reinforcement in
targeted local media. While non--English-language papers have readership throughout the county, they
often have·predorttlnantreadbrship in certain areas. ·Likewise; several bus routes·traverse great distances
across the county (i.e., Route 22, ·Eastridge Transit Center to Palo Alto/Menlo Park, or 121, Gilroy to
Sunnyvale), while other routes are mdre localized in·First 5 Community Investment Strategy-targeted
neighborhoods (i.e., Route 17, Gilroy Transit Center to St. Louise Hospital~ or 71, Eastridge Transit
Center to Great Mall/Main Transit Center). B~th countywide and targeted efforts will be included.
b) Identification of the location: The educational campaign that is proposed will reach throughout Santa
Clara County.'. As describecti~ th~ pa_ragraph above, however, a substantial· portion ·of the. proposed
project venues willbe sele¢ted to be most effective in commu:tiicating tb high risk individuals.

c) Description of,the.population.it will serve.• Th~ goai of the project is to save lives by promoting a safe
and non-threatening a,1.ternati've to abandon111ent and deat:p. of infants in Santa Clara County. At the primary
level, the population served is infants. Of course, the mothers will be spared lifelong grief as well as the
possibility ofdetection·and prosecution. The public a:vo.ids the slibstantial 7costs of the criminal justice·
system. Society promotes a more humarie•environment for distraught mothers. Teachers and other school
. personnel are more confident and·better- able to help the young people in their charge. But, again, most
importantly, the project advances a life-sustaining·opportunity for newborns.
d) -Furtherance of First.S's Community investment Plan. First 5 $aµta Cla,ra County is weli known for its
emphasis on prevention and early intervention through innovative collab.o.rations. Fully in concert with
those objectives, the proposed project supports the First 5 goal "to provide information and access so that
young chitdren are born healthy and experience optimal health and development." The funding is requested
as an element of the First 5 strategy of "Community Engagement and Awareness (universal/county-wide)."
The project also. will utilize the valuable information resulti~g froqi the High-Risk Design strategy of First
5 Santa Clara County's geomapping of t~e prevalence of risk factors 8:nd combined cumulative risks.
These high-risk areas will be more heavily-targeted with the outreach and educational mess·ages to the
extent it is possible, such as selection ofhus aaverti.~hig on targeted routes .
. First 5 Santa Clara County jplned Santa Cl~a Couµty government, along. with repres~ntative~ from cities,
fire departments,·other governmental agencies, faith-based organiz~tions, community-b~ed organizations,
·foster parents, and the coi:nmu,nity at large, in participating on the Santa Clara County Safe Haven Task
Force. Task Force members clevoted countiess, hours to the creation of the local safe surrender procedures
as well as plans to promote and publicize the law anci the local Safe Haven sites. Santa Clara County
government, through the·leadership ofiti; Social Services Agency,·.would like to continue the partnership
with ·First 5 Santa Clata County' nn this vital effort.'· In acknowledgement of its important contribution, it is
further pr,oposed-that the logo' of First 5:Santa Clara ·county be included along·with the Santa Clara County
logo on project-produced materials and advertising instruments.
..
.

.

.

p

.

e) Funding amount being requested. This request is for $50,000 to be utilized over a one-year period in the
following:categoiies: (1) $f5;000 will be used for advertising in targeted ethnic media publications that
appropriately reflect county demographics and:will focus·on ihdividuals/groups1ess likely to read English
language publications. (2) $'15,000 will be budgeted for a mix of interior and exterior bus signage. (3)
$20,000 will be expended for junior and senior high school personnel: training, includiag kits that contain
copies of the locally produced DVDs, information and suggestions •for teachers and other 'School personnel,
and materials for distribution to students. ·Schools will be selected based on risk factor criteria.
2

ADa,naonea oaoy rouna aeaa at rasl rooa resmuram

Posted on Thu, Jan. 12, 2006

Abandoned baby found dead at fast food restaurant
By Sandra Gonzales
Mercury News

A dead newborn baby boy was found Inside a garbage can in front of a Jack in the Box restaurant in Newark Wedne~day
afternoon.
A transient searching for food discovered the body inside a shopping bag at about 4:30 p.m., said Newark Police
Detective Sgt. Bob Douglas. A customer at the fast food store qt 39017 Cedar Boulevard near Mowry Avenue attempted
to revive the baby with cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but was unsuccessful.
When police arrived, they determined the baby was dead. Authorities estimate the baby, who ·was wrapped in infant
sleeping clothes, was less than two weeks old. The baby boy, who was bornfull-term, did not appear to be injured or
abused. Authorities say he was probably left in the garbage can after 1 p.m., the last time it was emptied.
The baby"s race has not yet been determined, but he has a dark complexion and dark hair.
The Alameda County Coroner's Office will conduct an autopsy to determine the cause of death.
No arrests have been made, and authorities have no active leads.

It is unclear why the baby was left in the garbage can instead of a hospital, particularly in light of a law that allows
parents to surrender newborns.
Safe Arms for Newborns passed in 2001 allows parents to surrender newborns within 72 hours after birth without fear of
'' arrests.
The law allows parents to leave the unwanted newborns at hospitals and a number of fire stations.
Anyone with information about this case is asked to call the Newark Police Department Detective Bill Shaffer at (510)
793-1400 ext. 231 or Detective Sgt. Bob Douglas at (510) 793-1400 ext. 247. Information can also be provided
anonymously via the Silent Witness Hotline by calling (510) 793-1400 ext. 500.

© 2006 MercuryNews.c,,m and wire service sources. All Rights Reserved.
hltp;//www.mercurynews.com

http://www.mercurynews.corn/mld/mercurynews/news/local/states/califomia/the_valley/13... 1/13/2006

ANNUAL STATISTICS
Safely Surrendered/Abandoned Alive/Abandoned Dead Babies

c~001

c~002

c~003

c~004

Jan- Se~
2005

Total to Date

Safely Surrendered Babies

2

16

23

30

39

110

Abandoned_ Alive Babies

30

33

25

23

16

127

Abandoned Dead Babies

11

11

1

1

0

24

Total Babies

43

60

49

54

55

California Department of Social Services
CWDAB/CFSD
Released: 10/12/2005

..

'

261

COUNTY TASK FORCE CONTINUES TO RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT
THE SAFELY SURRENDERED BABY LAW
In 2001, California enacted SB 1368 (Brulte), commonly known as the Safely
Surrendered Baby (SSB) or "Safe Haven" Law, in response to the rise in abandoned
·baby'deaths throughout the State. In Santa Clara County alone, three babies were
found abandoned during the summer of 2004. The Board of Supervisors believes,
however, that one abandoned baby is too many. As a result, the Board approved the
formation of the Safe Haven Task Force on August 3, 2004 to help increase public
awareness about the SSB Law. The Task Force is comprised of 120 children's and
women's advocates, health and medical professionals, educators, emergency services
personnel, social workers and community outreach staff.
Under the SSB Law, parents or other lawful custodians may safely and anonymously
surrender their baby within seventy-two hours of birth at a designated Safe ·
Surrender site. The SSB Law grants the surrendering individual(s) immunity from
criminal prosecution for abandonment, provided the baby shows no visible signs of
abuse or neglect. It additionally provides a fourteen-day "cooling off" period during
which the parents or legal custodians may begin the process to reclaim their baby if
they so choose. In Santa Clara County, parents also have the unique option to call
911 to arrange for a Safe Surrender. In those cases, the County will dispatch an
ambulance to the infant's location and conduct an on-site Safe Surrender.
Since the SSB Law has taken effect, at least 151 babies have been found abandoned
and 110 newborns have been safely surrendered in California. The California_
Department of Social Services (CDSS) reports that the statewide number of babies
abandoned each year has decreased while the number of safely surrendered babies
has steadily increased. For example, data shows that 41 babies were found
abandoned and 2 babies were safely surrendered in 2001. In comparison, by the
third quarter of 2005, 16 babies were found abandoned and 39 were safely
surrendered.
· ·
While the statistics from CDSS show promise, they also reveal the need for further
public education about the existence of a safe and legal alternative to abandonment.
To meet this objective, the County's Safe Haven Task Force has focused its efforts on
educating a broad spectrum of females of childbearing age and their families about
the SSB Law. Recently, these efforts have helped the County earn a $5,000 grant from
the Lucile Packard Foundation to produce a training video for use with teens and
other target groups. County staff expects to finish production of the video this
February and begin showing it in schools this spring.

Page 1 of2

_,,



I

.,

COUNTY TASK FORCE CONTINUES TO RAISE AWARENESS ABOUT
THE SAFELY SURRENDERED BABY LAW
In _addition to creating an effective public education program, the Task Force has
been instrumental in pushing through key legislative initiatives, policies and
procedures relating to Safe Surrender. Some of its major accomplishments to date
include:
• Endorsing legislation to permanently remove the SSB Law's sunset
date previously set for January 1, 2006, which the State Legislature
approved in August 2005.
• Working with the Board of Supervisors to encourage all jurisdictions
within Santa Clara County to pass Safe Haven resolutions. Now
every fire station in every city in the County is a designated Safe
Surrender site.
• Developing a detailed Safe Surrender protocol for all County and nonCounty agencies that may be involved in handling a Safe Surrender.
In May 2005, the County successfully conducted a countywide drill to
assess the readiness and reliability of this plan.

Surrendering an infant is undoubtedly one of the most difficult choices a parent may
face. Parents who make this decision, however, can be assured that their baby will
be placed in the care of competent medical staff and ultimately, into a welcoming.
home. As a member of the Board of Supervisors, I remain committed to keeping our
children safe and healthy by continuing to support the Safe Surrender alternative.

Page 2 of2

,,

Item 6

/f.....,...._,__~~

FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Joint Meeting of
Program and Evaluation Committees

FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Meeting Date:

12/16/05

Action:
X
Discussion:
Selection Process: __ RFP

Submitted By:

Cathy Andrade, Director· and
Laura Buzo, Manager

----

__ RFQ __Sole Source·

_x_Not Applicable

TITLE:
Happy Hollow Corporation/Happy Hollow Park & Zoo Proposal
RECOMMENDED ACTIONS:
Accept the Happy Hollow Corporation/Happy Hollow Park & Zoo proposal and refer to staff
to review in preparation for the Commission's 2006 Budget Workshop.
SUMMARY OF REQUEST:
Happy Hollow Park & Zoo improvements and expansion to its facility will begin in early
2007. The plan proposes a range of one-time funding opportunities from $1,500,000 to
· $500,000, that will serye young children in the community with interactive educational
, _) experiences and creative play for many years to come. These projects include an area for
\
animal habitat, additional interactive play areas, new amusement rides and a new
education facility. A partnership with Happy Hollow will result in positive exposure for
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County in the community and exciting outdoor adventures for
children and their families.
BACKGROUND:
Happy Hollow Park & Zoo has been serving the families of San Jose and the surrounding
community since its gates opened in 1961. Happy Hollow offers a unique combination of
fun and adventure for the entire family, while providing a safe and interactive experience
for all ages. The mission of Happy Hollow Park & Zoo is to provide entertaining,
affordable, educational, and conservation-driven adventures for families with young
children. The development of Happy Hollow's Master Plan is a milestone in the life of this
community institution and is greatly anticipated by residents of the Bay Area.
Happy Hollow serves many of the less fortunate in the community through programs,
events and discounts. They also have partnerships with many organizations .in the
community that serve others in need. ·
FISCAL IMPACT:
· There is no fiscal impact at this time. The proposal will be considered by the Commission
at their 2006 Budget Workshop.
ATTACHMENTS:
A. Letter of Intent and Proposal;
B. Education Program Statistics; 2003-04; and
C. Information Packet.

)Happy ·Hollow Corporation
·1300· Senter Road • San Jose, CA 95112
www.happyhollowparkandioo.org
November 29, 2005
First 5 Santa Clara County
Jolene Smith, Executive Director
4000 Moorpark Avenue, Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95117
Dear Jolene Smith & First 5 Commissioners,
.
Thank you for this opportunity to describe how First 5 Santa Clara County can partner with Happy
Hollow Park & Zoo to serve families and children, prenatal to age five, from our community. This
letter proposes projects that encourage early learning and ·education.
·
'

The San Jose City Council adopted Happy Hollow Park & Zoo's Master Plan in 1994. The build
out of our Master Plan expands the ·facility:from 12 acres to 16 acres. The creation of a new exhibit area for animal habitats, additional interactive play areas, new amusement rides and a-new
education facility are the focus of the plan. Funding for the implementation of the Master -Plan was
not available until November 2000 when the voters of San Jose approved Measure P, a parks bond-·
measure. The Happy Hollow improvements, scheduled to begin construction in the spring· of 2007,
will also include a new entrance and parking lot, upgraded utilities, an animal health care building, a
small restatirarit, and a gift shop. In 20'02, the 1994 plan was updated with the guidance of a team of
consultants that provided valuable expertise in the areas of zoo design and construction. Since that
time the costs of materials and construction have increased and.we have been asked to scale back on
our projects that include_ losing interactive and educational elements that are integral to our mission.
With support from First 5 Santa Clara ~ounty we can proceed with the project as intended,
providing furi, interactive learning experiences, and exciting outdoor adventures for children and
their families.

Potential Funding ·Projects:

Education Discovery Building
Endangered Species Carousel
Interactive Play Maze
-Interpretive Education Elements
Youth Education Programs .-

$1,500,000.
$ 800;000.
. $ ,600,000.
$ 500,000.
· $ ·500,000.
,<

Organization Background: Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, a City ofSan Jose owned and operated

facility, has been in existence since 1961. Situated in Kelley Park, San Jose's 172-acre regional
attraction, located 1.5 mtles southeast of the downtown area at 1300 Senter Road, we serve about
390,000 Bay Area visitors annually. Happy Hollow is an accredited institution that is home to 150
domestic, non-domestic an~~- endangered animals. The park offers a variety of play areas,
amusements, children's rides, puppet shows, interactive learning exhibits, and spacious picnic areas.

The Fundraising arm for Happy Hollow Park & Zoo, a 501C3 Non-Profit Organization
,,.,~

SANJOSE
H:d:<,Nof',',1:;,,11.y.-,d

Au1a1us

Zoo A:,,!D AQl/Allll'M

A.'\SOCIATIO~

Species Survival Plan

,•1",.'i·h1Ii1...•J ....,n-i,)'._O

Happy Hollow Corporation.
We offer reasonably priced rates, which allow all families, including those with low-income to
enjoy a day in safe, pleasant surroundings. Besides a low admission fee, special event discount and
free admission days, Happy Hollow has instituted a scholarship program for disadvantaged children
to participate in our educational classes and camps. Last year alone 1,839 children were reached·
through the scholarship p~ogram. Happy Hollow Corporation is a non-profit partner to Happy
Hollow Park & Zoo (HHP&Z). Happy Hollow Corporation funds minor capital improvements,
promotional activities, and the Education, Volunteer, Development and Membership Programs.

Community Served: Children O to 5 years old are a large segment of our guests. • During the .
school year we estimate that 95% of our visitors on Monday - Friday are families with children
under five. • Over the last three years 58,704 children under two. years of age were allowed free
admission. • Group admission for last year included 402 kindergarten classes or 24,158
kindergartners. • With the sponsorship .of local businesses, we hold. special events for the
community su~h as the annual safe Halloween Trick-or-Treating on site. • In July, we have a free
admission day with the exchange ofnon:..perishable food that we donate to the Second Harvest Food
Bank. • Once a month we offer Dollar Tuesday, allowing visitors admission for $1. 00. • We offer
a variety of classes to children, ages 2 years to 15 years old, year round including the summer and
on weekends. • Last year 6,300 children benefited from in/outreaches.with aµ additional 1,907
served by camps, sleepovers, night tours, and Saturday and weekday clas~es. • In 1999-00 Happy ·
Hollow Corporation received a donation from the community to establish a fund enabling lowincome individuals to participate in our Education Program. Since the inception of the Scholarship .
Fund, Happy Hollow education staff has collaborated with four organizations in the community to
provide opportunities to disadvantaged children. • The organizations are: Sacred Heart Community
Center, Loaves and Fishes Family Kitchen, San Jose Children's Shelter and Families First. This
past year, due to community demand, we expanded the program adding five more community
groups: Innvisi<;>n, .Girl Scouts of Santa Clara County, Support Network for. Battered Wom~n, EMQ
and San Jose School Districts. • Since its creation in 199<?, the membership program went from
zero to 34,400 members. • Approximat~ly 90% of our members are 1;3ay Area residents.
Our goal of becoming San Jose's premier child-oriented discovery park is within reach. As a result of
the Master Plan, we anticipate that HHP&Z will be a regional destination. HHP&Z will spark visitor's
imaginations and infuse them with joy and wonder in the natural world through opportunities for
creative play, recreation, educational classes and camps, and close-up encounters with live anim.als.
Expanding is vital to our future and our ability to execute our mission. We are excited about the
prospect of realizing our Master Plan goals with First 5 .Santa Clara County as our partner,
Your investment in Happy Hollow Park & Zoo will support children prenatal to age 5 and will be
publicly acknowledged. For more information, call our Development Officer, Victoria Johnson, at:
(408) 277-3498 or E-mail her at: [email protected] Thank you for your co~id~tion.
Sincerely,
Heather Lerner
.
Vice-President, Happy Hollow Corporation
Enc: 2003-04 Annual Report
Education Program Statistics
TbaukyouLettas

·

October 2005 Newsletter

.

.

.

f

)

.

.
Happy Hollow Education Programs for ages -0-5 years·
Fiscal Years 2003-04 and 2004-05
See attached October 2005 newsletter (Page 7) for a description of sample classes.
Fiscal Year 03-04
24 onsite classes including:
• Tails for Tots (ages 2-3 with an adult) [12 children perJ session class]
• Zoopers (ages 3-4) [16 children per 3 session class]
• Zoo Camps- we offered 6 week long camps for ages 5-6 each summer. How many campers
were 5 and how many were 6 was not tracked. [20 campers per week]
• · Puppet Camps- we offered 5 week long camps for ages· 5-6 each summer. How many
campers were 5 and how many were. 6 was not tracked. [16 campers p~r week]

72 Classroomwild ( outreach classes for ages 0-5)
• This is approximately 53% of total classro~mwild programs.
• Approximately 40 of these programs were on scholarship, or 55% of the classroomwild
programs for ages 0-5 were on scholarship. ·

C)

Fiscal Year 04-05
14 onsite classes including:
• Tails for Tots (ages 2-3-with an adult) [12 children per 3 session class]
• Zoopers (ages 3-4) [16 children per 3 session class]
• Zoo Camps- we offered 5 week long c,amps for ages 5-6 each summer. How many campers
were 5 and how many. were 6 was not tracked. [20 campers per week]
• Puppet Camps- we·offered 4 week long camps for ages 5-6 each summer. How many
campers were 5 and how many were 6 was not tracked. [16 campers per week]

85 Classroomwild (outreach classes for ages 0-5)
• This is approximately 51 % of total classroomwild programs.
• Approximately 36 of these programs were on scholarship, or 42% of the classroomwild
programs for ages 0-5 were on scholarship.

Happy Hollow Kindergarten Group Visits
Fiscal Years 2003-04 and 2.004-05
Fiscal Year 03-04
399 groups or 21,996 kindergartner guests
62% of all group visits were kindergarten groups
I

.

Fiscal Year 04-05
402 groups or-24, 158 kindergartner guests
60% of all group visits were kindergarten groups

August 16. 2004
Dear Kristy and the Happy Hollow Staff:

Thank you for teaching us so much about animals, their adaptations,
and their environments. We loved having opportunities to touch the
animals and compare their colors, textures, and smells. Thank you also
for allowing us to see all of the other animals that you keep in your zoo.
We really liked the lemurs and the pot bellied pig. The rides in your
park were lots of fun and riding them was an exciting ~nd to our
awesome summer ofleaming. We would not have been able to have
any of these experiences without your financial assistance. Thank you
for ·your amazing generosity!
InnVision's Summer Adventures Day Camp program is providing fun
and educational child care for.more than 20 families from InnVision
and San Jose Family Shelter. While the children are learning new
thipgs and preparing for the coming school year, their parents are able
to attend the appointments necessary to help them take steps to leave
the shelters and return to lives of stability.
InnVision, founded in 1973, has grown dramatically over the past
decade. Your participation serves to assist us in building a system of
care that provides long-term solutions for homeless people in an
environment that respects human dignity
InnVision is dedicated to helping individuals and families break the
cycle of poverty and homelessness. Thank you for joining us in this
mission - together we can make a significant impact toward ending
homelessness in Santa Clara County.
Sincerely,

-,

_ . /""' ,/ ;,.--/<_) '
. .·._,.,,_,_~~~ .

,F

,1·

.

Julia Burkhead
Youth Programs Coordinator
InnVision's Georgia Travis Center

974 Willow Street, San Jose Ca'. 95125

(408) 292-4286

Fax (408) 271-0826

Online: www.innvision.org

I -·)

\

.
1/16/04
From: Varda Perelman
Children Activities Coordinator
To:

'()

Hitachi Corporation

On behalf of the children and mothers at the shelter, I would like to thank
the Happy Hollow Zoo and their staff for the wonderful service they provide
to the community by educating about animals, awareness, and appreciation
for nature. They have been providing the shelter residents with joy and love
towards animals. For many residents, this has been the first time they are
exposed to animals anc:l learn not to fear or hurt them but to love and respect
them. Another aspect of this great activity is to show children and women
that have been victims of domestic violence that someone cares for them,
and that ~omeone expresses unconditional love for them.
Sincerely;

11(,l,l,da ~a..__
Varda Perelman

19.75 W. EL CAMINO REAL • SUITE 205 • MOUNT_AIN VIEW, CALIFORNIA 94040
650-940-7850 • CRISIS LINE: 800-572-2782 , FAX: 650-940-1037 , WWW.SNBW.ORG
A UNITED WAY AGENCY

·,!
-----------r-·------·

-------------------·--------

------------·-

l

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - · - · · · - - - - - · · · - - - · - -·--- ____ _!·----;•-

--------- ---- --------------------------·------------------ -------·-- -- ------·

-

....... -

··--

--

-· --• ..

.

-

. ---------

--· ...

-· .... --·----- ---- --·---------------------------------·--·-------------·--·--·---··--·· ----------·------------··-·- .· - .... . .. . -- -- -. . . -- .. i- - .

-- -

.

(

.\

.

.

J'
)

Happy Hollow Park & Zoo is a City of San Jose facility. We receive the
majority of operation and capital funding from the City of San Jose.
Additional funding is provided by Happy Hollow Corporation.

HAPPY HOLLOW CORPORATION
REVENUE & EXPENSE

HAPPY HOLLOW PARK & ZOO
REVENUES RECOUPED BY CITY

REVENUES

REVENUES

$ 28,599 Resuicted Income
(Grants, Donations,
Events & Fundraising)

Admissions
Parlcing
Parry Ar~ Rental
Remote Control Boats
Kelley Park Train
Souvenirs
Snack Bar
Animal Food Sales
Education Activities
HHC Contribution
Refunds
Over/(Short)

$521,071 Unrestricted Income
(Membership Dues,
Interest/Dividends, Board Dues,
Fundraising, Stroller/Wheelchair
Rentals, Key Sales, Wishing Well)
$549,670 Total Income•

EXPENSES
$31,364

Total Revenue

Resuicted Expense
(Exhibir Renovation,
Grant project expense)

18,011
98,716
45,332
146,156
72,143
1 15,503
$495,861

Unrestricted Expense
Administra1ion
Education & Volunteer Program
Fundraising Program
Membership Program
Operations
Marketing & Special Events
Total Unrestricted Expense

$527,225 Total Expense•
NOTE: CASH BASIS ACCOUNTING
• Based on FY 2004 Audited Figures

CITY OF SAN JOSE EXPENSES
EXPENSES
$1,991,244 Salaries (Full1ime & Part-time)
380,771 Benefits & Retirement
$2,372,015 Total Personal Services
$34,370
304,007
164,565
91
816
41,927
826
$546,602

Utilities
Supplies & Marerials
Vehicle Operating
(Includes Rides)
Rental Equipment
Printing/Advertising
Contractual Services
Mileage/Dues
& Subscriptions
Total Non-Personal Services

$2,918,617 Total City
Operations Expenses

1,004,090
325,785
14,490
15,174
0
154,696
498,881
46,600
I 14,718
239,396
-236
-368

$2,413,226

HOW YOU CAN INVEST IN
HAPPY HOLLOW PARK & ZOO
Become a member! Ask your employer
for a matching gifi when you join and every
time you renew your membership.
Already a member? lnvesr in our
upper-level membership program.
Explore corporate sponsorship!
We have sponsorship opportunities for
exhibits, rides, amusements, special events
and ad campaigns. Call (408) 277-3498.
Adopt an Animal! You get the
satisfaction of caring for an animal, but we
do all the work. Your contribution helps
provide enrichment for 1he animals.
Have a Parry! You can rent our pleasant
facilities for 'birthday parties and other group
festivities. Call (408) 277-4193 to make a
reservation.

Become a Board Memba of Happy
Hollow Corporation! Help raise funds and
promote Happy Hollow Park & Zoo.
Make a tax-deductible donation to
Happy Hollow Corporation! Then ask
your employer 10 match your gift.
Give stock! Apprecia1ed securities may
be the ideal way to give a gift ro
Happy Hollow. Call (408) 277-3498.
Remember Happy Hollow Park & Zoo
in your will! Make a bequest in your will or
living trus1 in the form of a specific amount
or a percentage of your estate.

.

..

.

Q.

'

.

EDUCATION PROGRAM

MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL

288 education programs were completed for the year.
8,207 children/adults participated in our education programs.
14 new curriculums were developed and provided.
1,839 children received scholarships co attend classes sponsored by the
Jim Ward Schol:1.rship Fund.

Hon. Mayor: Ron Gonzales
Nora Campos
Cindy Chavez
David D. Cortese
Pat Dando
Judy Chirco
Linda J. LeZone
Chuck Reed
Terry Gregory
Forrest Williams
Ken Yeager

Number of Children Served by Education Program Scholarships

""

.,.
""

,.

()

On behalf of children in Silicon Valley, we are appreciative of the individual, foundation and
corporate support that has made it possible for Happy Hollow Park & Zoo to increase the
Education Program scholarship opportunities t0 meet the increasing demand from the
communiiy.

N1mber of Chidren Participating in Education Programs

The Happy Hollow Park & Zoo education staff served significantly more children
. by providing more group programs.

MEMBERSHIP PROGRAM

0

Total Attendance was 337,123
individuals
Member Attendance was 93,142
,;;i._9 C/'79
individuals
Group Attendance reached
(school visits & communiry groups)

Memberships reached 7 .756 households,
or approximately 31,024 individuals.

••

••
••


HHC BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Marti Rao, President
Bill Bost, Vice-President
Patrick Coleman, Treasurer
Amy Mahoney, Secretary
Bill Adams
Kathleen Cook
Susanne Hovis
Heather Lerner
Manhew Mendizabal

MAJOR SPONSORS AND
GRANT PROVIDERS
Happy Hollow Park & Zoo values the
generous support of the following individuals,
foundarions, corporations and organizations:

•••
••

••


••

Brownlee Foundation
Dan & Nina Dobkin
eScrip
Feral Eye Design & Development
Hitachi Data Systems
Hitachi Foundation
Intel Corporation
JamieVierra.com
Kirsch Foundation
Mercury News Wish Book
Netflix
Petco
Sme of CA,
Paul Chaffee Zoological Grant
Target Scores
Mike & Ruch Verbois

MATCHING GIFTS
Gartner Charil)' Fund of the Fideliiy
Investments Charitable Gift Fund
Hewlm Packard Employee Charitable·
Giving Program
Microsoft
Sony Electronics
United Technologies

I

I

I

f

.
ACCOMPLISHMENTS
Achieved through the combinrd effem and
mourw ofthr City ofSan Jose and Happy
Hollow Corporation.
Welcomed cwo Teal Ducks and four
Whistling Ducks to our animal collection.
Celebrated the birth of a baby wallaby.
-Added rwo miniature horses, Sweet
William and Spice Girl.
Acquired a crow, an owl, cwo guinea pigs
and a female opossum for our Education
Program.
Built a new exhibit for 1he mumjac deer.
Renovated the fishing cat exhibit into a
larger exhibit for the marmosets.
Created a Backyard Habitat exhibit,
emphasizing the varieties of creatures
found in our backyards.
Celebrated the opening of the Spiderweb
Educational Play structure and
educational sign.
Introduced special boxed lunches for
on-site parties. An article about Happy
Hollow's innovative Kid's Cafe menu
appeared in "Tourist Attractions and
Parks" magazine February/March issue.
Produced one new puppet show, 'Anansi,
the Spiderman of Africa'.
Added one-dimensional animal art to the
Dragon Ride Tunnel exterior.
Replaced the Merry-Go-Round platform
deck with an ecologically grown and
farmed Brazilian hardwood.
Installed new, colorful picnic tables for
parry areas in the park and planted
flowers throughout the park.
Collected 8 barrels of food on our annual
Free Admission Day for the Second
Harvest Food Bank. Happy Hollow was
featured on the Mercury News Second
Harvest Food Bank grocery bag insert that
was distributed to 275,000 homes.

VOLUNTEER PROGRAM
Community groups who came for a day to
work on projects that improve the facility
volunteered 56 hours. Two Maintenance
Technicians volunteered 364 hours.

\

\

I

\

\

EDUCATION PROGRAM
"Drdicatrd to the teaching and sharing of
information about animals, habitat
conservation and rndangrrrd species. "
Education Staff organized a supply drive
for the children of Uganda, Africa who are
learning about conservation at the
Ngamba Island Chimpanzee Sanctuary
through a project called, "The_ Kibale
Forest Environmental Education Project".
Scaff c;ollecced and sent 4 boxes of needed
, crayons, markers, paper, magnifying

Ii

glasses,· raincoats, binoculars and ocher
supplies for 1he. hands-on science oucreach
program.
Educacion scaff panicipaced in NASA's
'JASON Project'. This project is linked to
the Smichsonian Panama Canal projec1
chat NASA televised for 1he JASON
participants via satellite. Happy Hollow
Educacion staff joined 13 mher
organizations in presenting rainforest
informacion (biological artifacts, rainforest
products, corservation, and recycling)
over a _cwo-. week period to I 1,000 Bay
Area Juriior High smdents and their
teachers.
Our Zooteens raised $2,340 over 1he
summer for 1heir Vesta-Dogs program that
bought 3 bullet and mb proof vests for
the K-9 animals on the Capitola and East
Palo Alto Police Forces.
This year Docents, Zooteens and Keeper
Aides volunteered 4,56 I hours working
with animals and the public.
Provided the first ever Education Program
pre-camp Open House.

CONSERVATION EFFORTS
It is becausr ofour commitment to lift on
Earth that we provide opportunities to create
awareness, stewardship andfonds ta h;lp ,
protect and prrserve our home far all species.
Happy Hollow became a model for Zoo's
and aquariums across 1he country with
our Cell Phone Recycling Program.
Twenty-five zoos started their own
program, modeling ours.
Happy Hollow hosted a fundraiser a1 1he
Member's Parry and raised $4,752.50
which was donated to the Madagascar
Fauna Group, helping to protect the fauna
and flora of Madagascar.
Staff and volunteers sold snacks and sodas
co raise funds which were sent 10 help the
devastated Baghdad Zoo.
Panicipated in the Species Survival Plan
by sending a female wallaby 10 Kansas
City on loan.
An interactive Watershed Wacch Display
sign was donated by Sama Clara Valley
Urban Runoff Pollution Prevention
Program, 13 cities, and the Sama Clara
Valley Water District. The display now
stands as a symbol of the partnership
berween Happy Hollow and 1he
Watershed Wa1ch campaign.
Zookeepers conducted a private garage
sale to benefit staff field research projects.
Zook~epers, Education staff and
volunteers raised funds through 1he
Zookeeper's C.A.N.N.E.D. Project
(Conserving and Nurturing Namral
Ecosyscem Diversity) for ACTERRA, a
local non-profit group chat rerforms creek
cleanups and non-native plant removal in
local creek systems.

SPECIAL EVENTS
·Summer entertainment feamred special
progr~ms by: Zoo To You, Zun Zun,
BAARS, and the month-long Cats Rule
and Dogs Drool show.
Co-sponsored "Meet Your Best Friend' , ·
dog adoption promotion with the Silicon
Valley Humane Society chat ran from
April through October. The promotion
showcased adoptable dogs and the
Humane Society's adoption program.
Hosted over 3,500 visitors for the 'Haunt
1he Hollow' event with trick--0r-treating
and extinct species graveyard.
Celebrated Migratory Bird Month with
special bird presentations and activities for
our guests.
Thanked 2,600 guests at the membership
appreciation parry, 'The Party on the Wild
Side.'
Held cwelveDollar Days (one $ 1 01)
Admission Day per month) and
experienced record attendance from
(
families in the community.
Held the annual 'Feast for the Beasts'
Thanksgiving event for over 600 guests,
where the animals receive exotic treats for
enrichment.
Acknowledged supporters of the Animal
Adoption Program at our annual Breakfast
and behind-the-scenes experience with 1he
animals.

0

0

AWARDS AND RECOGNITION
Happy Hollow Corporation president
Mani Rao was selected for the National
Recreation and Parks Association
Volunteer Award.
San Jose Business Journal rated Happy
Hollow Park & Zoo #4 of 25 'Most
Popular Tourist Attractions' in Silicon
Valley.
For the second consecutive year Bay Area
Parent Magazine readers voted Happy
Hollow Park & Zoo the "Best Place to See
Apimals."
Our web site received a DesignFirms
2004-05 Award for excellence in web
design
Happy Hollow's "Jack & Jill Show" aired
cwo NEW programs on Channel 15. The
shows highlight the animals of Happy
Hollow and their role as ambassadors for
their species.
Happy Hollow Park & Zoo was featured
on the Community Access TV channel.
Happy Hollow was a feature of the half
hour show "Animal Companions" tha1
aired the month of July on KMTV in
Mountain View.
Happy Hollow appeared throughout
'Evening Magazine, television program on
October 61h.

0

0

0

z

)I

V

d

MOllOW AddVW

.,v" ,.

';.,ft,!''-~-~- , ..

...

Classroomwild

., Night Cr~~-timis lQIJ.tDteilnto the dark and mysterious world of nocturnal animals. Discover
the special,
hey must have to hunt for food, look for shelter and survive at night!
Native Cali!'
will be discussed as well as animals from around the world. (K-6th)

"

Provide your students with an exciing exploration into the lives of animals!
Each 45-60 minute class includes hands-on activities, the use of biofacts
(biological artifacts) unique to zoo education, and an animal presentation.
All classes are taught by a Happy Hollow Education Specialist with the exception
of Go Wild! and Zoofaris which ore taught by Docents. Classes may be presented
in your classroom, community center, etc. or may be presented at the zoo while
on a visit to Happy Hollow!

Defen.ders o e Rainforest Unique visual aids illustrate the importance of rainforest
conservation including a discussion of rainforest products, deforestation, and protection while
exploring the abundance and variety of life in the rainforest.
(4th-7th)
Going, Going, Gone 'i~ijls become extinct everyday and your students can take action
to prevent it! Hands-on actiJ,es will demonstrate how animals become threatened,.. _... , .,
endangered or even extinct learn what we can do to help save them.
(4th-7th),

an~.

Scouts con earn oHappy Hollow Zoo patch or work towards earning various other
badges ond patches! Coll the Education Department for information on the
badges and patches you con earn.

Zoo Careers Do your students want to be Zoo Keepers or veterinarians? These ore
only a few of the jobs available at a zoo. learn about all of the;Mportant jobs at a zoo
and help your students discover whether o Zoo Career is right fo(}.llem!
(4th-7th)

f" .

Go Wild! At the zoo or in the classroom with our Docent led animal adventure.
Basic animal biology and ecology are discussed and illustrated with on animal
presentation.
(All Ages)

Zoofaris

'•

.

will need.
.' ·.:,:};,
i
' \:'i\:i[{?:~fit~): -~-- .. ~:•
What's for Dinner? Discove/;(~~\;br , .'~tions that help"~oj~cilffiVh.t/ff
ond eat their meat, fruits, or bugs["ih~mi~e•'~~tirnportonce of the predlifoi-prev'
relationship, how animals find their'foad ondJo~ ttiey eat
' (K-3rd)

:lrti~~i

Wha's That Animal? Do you know
a mammal.a mani~al, a
bird a bird, a reptile a reptile, or an insect an in'sect? Disc~ver,\l!e chcir.actenstics
that define each of these animal groups. Classes may be takeii:as-a' 4'week
series; one animal group discussed per class.
.•:>
· · (K-3rd)

:;;i•,y
·r:,:t,:!
..:ii/,~'/!

. ""2

Join us for on exciting tour of Happy Hollow Zoo with education ;i~ff or Docents. Zoofaris
discussions are illustrated with zoo biofocts and educational props: Zoo tours ore approximately
45-60 minutes. depending
on the group and do not include on animal presentation.
. . '

Animals and Me For many young children lhis will be their first introduction
to common and unique animals. Explore the differences in animal size, shape,
color and texture while learning how to touch and observe animals, (PreK-K)
Good Pets, Bad Pets What characteristics make_qn animal a good pet and
why? What is the difference between a domestiC:rind wild animal! learn how
10 choose the right pet for you an(ho~;in ' :lfftil~ TLC '.(T~~~erJ~Y,iQiif~.r,~)i}t

.... ,.

Fant~stii,but Fragile Zo~s or~ homes for many animals thci't are endangered species.
Discuss what has made many of Happy. Hollow's animals endangered, the various programs
<.:i~&~;hove to change this, q~d what yob/' students can do to help.
(3rd-7th)
-~nimal A'~~Ptitions--.~i1iww91s have special characteristics that help them find food, ploy
and survive ·in their natural b'./ib'i.fri~. Disfover the special adaptations each of our zoo animals
hove OS we obser~e them go';~geWrJheir"daily routines.
(3rd-7th)
, ·· ,. .:jf'.:~!-

Contact ·lJs...?::

.,. •':< :~;\ /!,,:'.C
Hapj!y Hollow}!~i_~::~.
Edµ[email protected]~!!\.~0J}J30Q~~enter Road, San Jose, California 95112
Phone·(408) Wl:SI 20' Fax (408) 298-1289 Email [email protected]
... wYi~:h:appyh'oliawparkandzao.org

z~r·· , :· ,

Item 7
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Joint Meeting of
Program and Evaluation Committees

FIRST.5
SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Meeting Date:
Action:

December 16, 2005

X

Selection Process:

Discussion:
_ _ RFP

Submitted By:

Ron Soto, CPO

__ RFQ __Sole Source

_Not Applicable

TITLE:
United Way Silicon Valley 211 Proposal
RECOMMENDED ACTIONS:
· Accept the United Way Silicon Valley 211 proposal and refer it to staff for consideration
at the Commission's 2006 Budget Workshop.
SUMMARY OF REQUEST:
-)
,,

United Way' Silicon Valley's s goal is to offer a partnership opportunity with FIRST 5
Santa Clara County. The request to the Commission is for $100,000 to support the
planning and start-up phases of 2-1-1 in Santa Clara County for 2006. By partnering
early with United Way/211, a system will be developed that clearly meets the diverse
. and consid~rable needs of our prenatal through age 5 population and their families.
Through 211, families will be served in two possible ways-from. the 24/7 call center
and· from a web-site that will accompany the 2-1-1 system. The 2-1--1 system would
further FIRST S's overall goal of promoting the healthy development of all children
prenatal through age 5 years within all three Components A B, and C of the Community
Investment Strategy.
'
BACKGROUND:
United Way serves as the convening·agency in the planning and implementation of 2-11 services in this county. United Way expects to play a significant role in underwriting
the new 2-1,.1 service. 2-1-1 is an easy-to:.remember telephone number that impacts
communities by connecting people with important services and volunteer opportunities,
reduces the stigma of accessing services, builds efficiency of the n·on-profit sector,
serves as a useful planning tool, and empowers the nation to better respond to largescale emergencies.
FISCAL IMPACT:
United Way Silicon Vailey is requesting $100,000 from FIRST 5 as a portion of the total
cost of the 2-1-1 planning and development for 2006.
ATTACHMENTS:
A. Proposal from United Way for $-100,000.

•·

Item 7
Attachment A

. . United Way Silicon Valley

December I, 2005
Ms. Jolene Smith
Executive Director
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
4000 Moorpark Ave., Suite 200
San Jose, California 95117
Dear Jolene:
United Way Silicon Valley is excited to take this opportunity to seek a partnership with FIRST 5 Santa Clara
County. United Way serves as the convening agency in the planning and implementation of 2-1-1 services in this
county. We expect to play a significant role in underwriting the new 2-1-1 service,
2-1-1 is an easy-to-remember telephone mnnber that impacts communities by connecting people with important
services and volunteer opportunities, reduces tlie stigma of accessing services, builds efficiency of the non..profit
sector, serves as a useful planning tool, and empowers the nation to better respond to large-scale emergencies.
DESCRIPTION OF THE PROJECT-State-Wide

.

'

Context: 2-1-1 service has been activated.in six counties: Los
Angeles, Orange, Riverside, San Diego, Santa Barbara and Ventura. msT 5 Commissions in those counties have
played major roles in bringing these systems to fruition. .Through this strong col_l;iboration, the 2-1-1 syst~ms have .
been able to incorporate features early in the design stage that aid children and their parents who fall within the
FIRST 5 mandate. The funding levels provided by local FIRST 5 commissions range from $40,000 per year in
Santa Barbara to $1,600,000 per year in Los Angeles. In return for this generous support the 2-1-1 Call Centers
provide specialized call support and case referral including, in some situations, social workers (MSW's) prQviding
advice to incoming callers relating to FIRST 5 eligible concerns.
·
·
United Way's goal in this county is to offer you a similar partnership opportunity. Our requ!!st to your Commission
is for $100,000 to support the planning and start-up phases of 2-1-1 in our county for 2006. By partnering early with
us, together we will be able to develop a system that clearly will meet the diverse and considerable needs of our
prenatal through .5-year population and their families. We envision families can be served in two possible waysfrom the 24/7 call center and from a web-site that will accompany the 2-1-1 system.

Regular calls through the main 2-1-1 number: When a person dials 2-1-1, the receiving call-taker at the 2-1-1
Center will ask the caller if the person or persons they are calling on behalf of meets the FIRST 5 criteria. The
receiving 2-1-1·staffer is prompted to launch specialized custom data jntake screens and can access information
reserved for the specified call.
For example, if the child is four years old, the screen can then display prompts that ask where the child resides by
Zip Code. Given FIRST 5 Santa Clara County's identified strategic goals, these customization features would be
helpful for discerning whether a child resides in Component A (most Zip Codes), Component B-Focused
Neighborhoods (Zip codes 94040, 95118, 95128, 95133 or 95136) or Component C-Targeted Zip Codes (Zip
Codes 95111, 95112, 95116, 95122, 95127 or 95020). 2-1-1 would allow faster access through our 24/7 call center
to information about family support and wrap-around services, regardless of the caller's spoken language, through
our contracted translation service-beyond our own staffs' competencies in Spanish, Vietnamese and English. The
services in our database would be of benefit regardless of the special needs-developmental, cultural, age or
language of the child The parent or caregiver would no longer need to waste precious time seeking information
through call after call. With the proposed call management system the parent's call can be transferred to the service
provider.

1922 The Alameda • San Jose CA 95126 • 408-247-1200 · FAX: 408-249-4422 • www.uwsv.org

I

2-1-1 Santa Clara County Website: Access to this site would be free and open to the public. This access method
would have considerable appeal to families with more computer-literate capabilities. Furthermore, this website
could be linked to case management tools for Social Workers and others through a password-protected and fullyenccypted security system. (In Houston, Texas about 50% of the contacts are made through their website with
175,000 searches per year.) With FIRST S's participation will come considerable public recognition, including
display of FIRST S's logo along with clearly demarcated active hyperlinks through the 2-1-1 Santa Clara Countv
website to your FIRST S website and its specialized resources.
Silicon Valley 2-1-1 Timeline
Determine service provider~ - December 2005
Secure adequate funding agreements - June 2006
- Obtain letters of support and submit application to CPUC - March 2006; i.e. FIRST 5
Receive CPUC Approval - September 2006
2-1-1 in Santa Clara County goes Live - December 2006
IDENTIFICATION OF THE LOCATION: The 2-1-1 system during the planning stage will be located at the United Way
offices, 1922 The Alameda, San Jose, CA.
D ~ O N OF THE POPULATION TO BE SERVED: Parents and other caregivers of eligible children county-wide
and including people residing in designated Zip Codes who would receive access to additional information and
referrals, including case support.
Exl'LANATION AS TO HOW THE PROPOSED PROGRAM FURTHERS ONE OF THE STRATEGIES OF THE COMMISSION'S

5-YEAR CQMMUNITY INvEsTMENT PLAN: The 2-1-1 system would further FIRST S's over all goal of promoting
the health development ·ofall children prenatal through 5 years within all three Components A, B, and C. In
addition, the 2-1-1 system will strengthen focused service. delivery in such areas as: Community
Awareness/Education campaigns promoting the importance of the first 5 years of life, Preschool for All, Community
Partnerships and related Network of Services, Demonstration site and School Readiness Initiative. 2-1-1 will
increase the access to high-quality information about FIRST 5 and your partner services.

requesting

FuNDINGAMOUNT REQUESfED: We are
$100,000 from FIRST 5 as a portion of the total cost of the
2-1-1 planning and development for 2006. We expect to apply for continuing support from FIRST 5 Santa Clara
County commensurate with the proportion of FIRST 5 eligible children, parents and caregivers of the total
population of our county population (about 20%) in subsequent years. We are seeking funding from a variety of
partners. UWSV has not received board approval for a specific dollar amount yet; our intention is to seek funding
comparable to the county of Santa Clara's investment and equal to or greater than private foundations and other
funders. That amount could be in the $150,000 to $200,000 range. These prospective funders are govenµnent
entities including the County of Santa Clara, each county municipality, and a number of community organizations
including The Health Trust, Council on Aging, Community Foundation Silicon Valley, and the FIRST S

Commission.

Thank you for your support. If you have any questions, please contact me at (408) 345-4302 or email me at
[email protected]

Sincerely,

--?7/a/~ Lt/~
Marie L. Walker

President and CEO
United Way Silicon Valley

1922 The Alameda • San Jose CA 95126 • ·408-247-1200 • FAX: 408-249-4422 • www.uwsv.org

)

Board of Directors
Board Chair
Rick Fezell
Ernst & Young LLP
Vice Chair
Dick Levy
Varian Medical Systems

April 21, 2006

Treasurer
Steve M. Smith
Wells Fargo Bank
Secretary
Linda Sullivan
NBC11
Becky Ba~rook
PDF Solutions. Inc.
Lisa Buckingham
San Jose Mercury News

Ms. Cathy Andrade
Community Program Director
FIRST5 Santa Clara County
4000 Moorpark Ave. Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95117

Bob Campbell
Senior Housing Solutions
Leo Chavez
San Jose City College

Greg Davidson

Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher LLP
Gary Effren
Knight Ridder, Inc.
John Eichhorn
PayCyde, Inc.
Raquel Gonzilez
Bank of America
Autumn Gutierrez
Community Volunteer
Jeanette Horan
IBM Silicon Valley Laboratory
Cynthia Johnson
Agilent Technologies
Don Kassing
San Jose State University
Hsing Kung
Pine Photonics/Opnext, Inc.
Laura Lundy
Washington Mutual

Dear Cathy,
Attached are the materiais you requested in response to your q1.i'estions. This is also being ·
·
sent hard c~py today to your office.
I had a chance to speak with Ron S_oto and Bob Mason on Friday and feel we have provided
the needed detail. Of course, please do call if you need anything further.
Lastly, it's important to know that we are definitely iri·phase I ·of implementation of a 211
system for Santa Clara County. The design and developmenf of many of the critical
components have begun and we welcome First 5's inclusion to help bring this program to life
on February 11, 2007.
Appreciate all your efforts and look forward to a posi~ive response.
Sincerely,

Philip Ma
McKinsey & Co.
John Matheny
Microsoft Corporation
Kevin O'Connor
Solectron Corp.
Jim Pollock
Pollock Firiancial Group

Amari Romero-Thomas
Senior Vice·President .
Community Impact

Susan Prescott
Apple Computer
David Sandal
Applied Materials
AnllSingh
S.E. Laboratories, Inc.
Richard Terrell
Hewlett-Packard Co.
Don Watters
Community Volunteer
Mark Walker
President & CEO

1922 The Alameda, San Jose, CA 95126-1430
Visit us on the web at www.uwsv.org

,.

Response to questions from FIRST 5 on 2-1-1 Santa Clara County proposal
from United Way Silicon Valley
1. What is the start up cost, capital cost, operating cost of 211 Santa Clara
·
County?

In March, we furnished FIRST 5 with a detail, estimated budget for February
2006 through July 2008. To summarize, we estimate

o

Start Up costs ·at $321,240 (July - December 2006)

o

Capital Costs at $45,000 (July - December 2006)

o

Operating Costs at $452,997 (January - June 2007)

We continue to negotiate with technology vendors;·the outcomes may affect our
current projections. ,Please see new detail attachments.
2. How would FIRST

dollars be used; what would it support?

Primary use of funds will support the design, development, and implementation
of the software data fields in the 2-1-1 database for data collection and input.
First level fields will .represent useful family· ori~nted, ecological, broader based
information. Second level will be specific data fields relating to ,he prenatal to 5
year old population. The database development will include specific fields that
will be able to connect with FIRST S's network of services. Information will
represent countywide data as well as FIRST 5 Partnership areas. Data fields,
while generic in form, will furnish information specific to FIRST 5 partnership and
focus areas, and as'sist in the identification of gap in services. Costs include:

o
o

B~ta testing ·for both county and targeted areas; data entry and input call
up. The beta run is scheduled for December 2006.
Refinement of systems. Live Launch scheduled for February 11, 2007.

We welcome FIRST 5's input in the early design and development of this
important database, as well as the public website.
3. Please report who, are the other partners?

Since our last meeting and submitted proposal, we have been very excited about
the positive response from the community. We have begun to receive financial
commitments and endorsements for our CPUC application. We feel it is very
important to bring 2-1-1 to Santa Clara County through a Public/Private Venture ..
The response and feedback we have received reflects a common thought; 2-1-1
is a necessary service for Santa Clara County and will be of immeasurable . .
benefit.
Below is an update on our efforts:
Individual donors

o
o

We have targeted 12 Major Donors in Phase I solicitations using a new
case statement.
Leading former Silicon Valley CEO will be making a Community
Challenge of $50-$75K in May.

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org ·
04/21/06

· Unl<NWa'iSllla>nV.Oey

Corporations
o

Cisco is interested in joining our partner ranks by providing a Cisco
Fellow for the duration of one year to assist with technology planning for
211 sec as well as our statewide 211 system efforts. We are also
applying for an equipment grant for our VoIP system - in kind value $45K.
We are in discussions with Intel who has expressed an interest in being a
Lead Premier Sponsor for 2-1-1 Santa Clara County

o

Additional corporate prospects include:.
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o
o

Yahoo
Google
Microsoft
Hewlett Packard
Comcast
EBay
AMD
Synopsis
Cadence
Nvidia
Sun Microsystems
Fujitsu

Government ·
o The City of San Jose has put $100K in the City Manager's proposed
budget. We are connecting with all City of San Jose Council Members
and the Mayor to secure their support.
.
o Progress has been made with the Santa Clara County Board of
Supervisors, with Supervisor Liz Kniss as our 2-1-1 Champion. We have
met with the majority of the other Supervisors. Supervisor Jim Beall has
sent a letter of endorsement. Supervisor Blanca Alvarado has been an
early on supporter of 2-f-1; a meeting with her is in planning.
o We have begun meeting with representatives of the other 15 cities in
Santa Clara County:
• Met with four City Managers; San. Jose, Palo Alto, Gilroy, and
Morg~n Hill
• Two City Manager scheduled appointments; Cupertino, Campbell
• Meetings with remaining City Managers being ,scheduled
• Invited to present to the Association of City Managers in May
• .Presenting at Mountain View and Morgan Hill City Council
Meetings
Foundations
o •El Camino Hospital Foundation; received favorable ·response; dialogue
continuing.

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

UnltN: Wi1;srucDn V'.llley

Additional prospects include:
o
o
o
o
o

Palo Alto Medical Foundation
Valley Medical Foundation
San Jose Medical Foundation
Stanford Hospital
Lucile Packard Children's Hospital

Other key partners (non-financial)
o
o
o
o
o

San Jose Chamber of Commerce
American Leadership Forum
San Jose 311Center
Council on Aging (asking for funding)
The Health Trust (asking for funding)

We are seeking letters of endorsements for CPUC application from:
Service

AIDS/HIV Service
Alcohol and Drug Service
Business/Labor
Business/Labor
Services for Children and
Families
Crisis/Suicide Hotline
Disability Service
Domestic Violence
Service
Education
Emergency Food Provider
Emergency Disaster
Service

Employment Service
Health Service
Homeless Service
Library or Library System
Mental Health
Rape Crisis
Senior Service

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda: San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

Provider

The Health Trust
Pathways Society
San Jose Chamber of Commerce
South Bay Labor Council
First 5
Family and Children Services
County Suicide and Crisis
Services for Brain Injury
Domestic Violence Advocacy Consortium
Santa Clara County Office of Education
Second Harvest Food Bank
American Red Cross/Palo Alto
American Red Cross/Santa Clara Valley
SCC Office of Emergency Service
SVWIN
Kaiser
InnVision
MLKLibrary
Alliance for Community Care
YWCA
Live Oak Adult Day Care

4. How will services be identified for our O- 5 kids; what is the actual
connection to our high risk design?

As· per the description of the development of the data entry fields and data input;
information will relate to FIRST 5-focus and networks. Currently we work with a
number of the 9 Community Partnerships:
o
o
o
o
o
o
·o
o
o
o
o
o
p

o
o
o

Alum· Rock Counseling Center
Asian Americans for Community Involvement
Community Solutions
Cupertino Community Services
EMQ
Family and Children Services
Friends Outside
Gardner Family Care Corp.
Grail Family Services
Health Trust
MACSA
Parents Helping Parents
Project Sentinel
Rebekah's Children Services
Sacred Heart Community Services
San Juan Bautista Child Development Center

Additionally, relationships include (through the Partnership For School
Readiness):
·
o
o

Franklin McKinley School Distric,
Gilroy Unified Schaal District

FIRST 5 is currently seeking candidates to implement their Community
Engagement and Education Program. We would look to be an extended partner
with these Partnerships and offer the collateral from our Public Information
Campaign to be included with their materials for distribution to the targeted
populations.
2-1-1 Santa Clara County offers an innovative outreach component for engaging
and educating the client on access to services that they are looking for, and for
other services they were not aware of, through prompted questions by Call
Center personnel. Community knowledge is increased, muJti-lingual Call Center
personnel help to eliminate language barriers and feeling of-isolation, and they
act as a liaisori between the client and the service providers. Information on
program and project activity from the 9 Partnerships can be posted on the web
site utilizing a key word search. We envision a learning environment component
on the web site where tips and other educational material (parenting, play
learning, etc.) will be accessible.

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

5. What is your projected timeline?

2-1-1 Santa Clara County
Major Milestones for Implementation Year
Go LIVE February 11, 2007 (National 211 Day)

Jan. - June '06
• Presentations to County
and Municipalities
• Launch 21·1 Action Team,
Advisory Committee, and
Circle of Support
• Recruit Board 211
Champion: Linda Sullivan,
CEO, NBC 11
• Apply for CPUC approval
• Fundraising Campaign
launched

July - Nov.. '06
• IJWSV Board. Endorsement - $150K Seed
Funding
• Design and Development
of
- Internal Operations
- Contingency Plans
- Technology Plans
• Receive CPUC approval
• Public Information Campaign launched

Dec. '06 - Feb. '07
• December 2006 Beta Launch
• February 11 , 2007 LIVE Launch and Event

U'itodW1>1Sm<onV~
211 sonw aara

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

~-,~1.
Santa Cla(al:ounty

*

Get Connected. Get Answers.
Un~cdW•Y, Silic°"' \f4!1<y

United Way Silicon Valley

Expenses:
.
The table below shows the projected three-year budget and the expected units of service from
people calling the 2-1..,1 Call Center, or accessing the public website.

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

~~fal

·Santa Clara C~nly ;f

Get Connected.. Gel Answers,

United Way Silicon Valley

Uni,~ Yh.y S.'lii:OII v.n.y

Start-Up Budget

The Start up Budget covers the period of July 2006 - December 2006. This budget covers:







Completing the application to the California Public Utilities Commission
Hiring and training staff
.
Designing and implementing the website and database
Transferring health and human service data to the database
Developing and executing the fund raising plan
Design of the Public Information Campaign

··• ·tP~r.§:Q1111:¢f!~X.P~9.s.~$-.
·
.. . ..
~.
.
'

. ...

.

.. ·... ,.. ::·

..

Capital Expenses

Capital expenses include the voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) hardware and software.

Capital Expenses
VOiP Software/Equipment

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

I

$ 45,000

2

San1aCw•C~ntr.*

2_.~~·

-=:ii•..

Get Connected..GetAnswers.
Unk<dW.f S.'llcon V4!1w

United Way Silicon Valley

Operations Budget
The operations budget covers the period January 2007 through June 2009, a period of 30 months.
The most significant operational expenses are the implementation of the Public Information
Campaign and the cost of staffing the call center, which will maintain and continuously update
the health and human services database. It is projected that the unit of service, both direct 2-1-1
calls and accessing through the Internet, will increase at a 25% rate from year-to-year. The
contingency funds are to cover any unexpected increases in call volume. The overhead covers
the accounting, general management, fundraising and other operational costs incurred by United
Way.

United Way Silicon Valley
1922 The Alameda; San Jose, CA 95126
(408) 247-1200 www.uwsv.org
04/21/06

3

Item 8
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
Joint Meeting of
Program and Evaluation.Committees

4_6
FIRST 5

SANTA CLAIIA COUNTY

Meeting Date:

December 16, 2005

Action:
X
Selection Process:

Discussion:
RFP

Submitted By:
RFQ

Barbara Bernard, Training Director

_ _ Sole Source _

Not Applicable _X
_ _ __

TITLE:
Reach Out and Read Assessment proposal

RECOMMENDED ACTION:
Accept the Reach Out and Read Assessment Proposal and refer to staff to review in
preparation for the Commission's 2006 Budget Workshop.

SUMMARY OF REQUEST:
. The VMC Foundation is requesting $100,000 each year for 3 years for expanding the
)Reach Out and Read Assessment Program (RORAP). This pilot program, currently funded
by FIRST 5, provides early.screening for and preliminary assessment of developmental
delays and learning differences for approximately 26,000 unduplicated children 2 months
through age 5 at pediatric check ups each year. In last year's pilot project, FIRST 5 funding
helped to expand the program to six Santa Clara Valley Medical pediatric clinics. Based on
the projection of serving 30,000 children, VMC needs is to expand their volunteer base and
upgrade their part-time Program Coordinator to full-time status.
The RORAP uses the expertise of pediatric providers to assess child development while
also providing positive literacy interventions. By promoting cognitive growth and
developmental assessment, the program has been a powerful tool for pediatric providers
working with primarily low-income families in an underserved community.

BACKGROUND:
The Reach Out and Read Program (ROR) began in 1989 with the mission to make literacy
promotion a standard part of pediatric primary care in order to increase literacy and literacyreadiness by age 5. ROR trains healthcare providers to incorporate parental guidance
about the importance of reading aloud to young children into each well-child check up from
2 months to 5 years of age. This intervention is furthered enhanced by community
volunteers who role model book-sharing activities for families in the clinic waiting rooms.
1

The Reach Out and Read Assessment Program began with Dr. Antonia C.harles, a
pediatric physician at East Valley, who found that the implementation of Reach Out and
Reach provided an opportunity to screen children for possible developmental delays during
office visits. FIRST 5 provided seed money for the pilot RORAP in 2004/2005.

FISCAL IMPACT:
There are not fiscal implications at this time. The proposal will be considered by the
Commission at their 2006 Budget Workshop
ATTACHMENT:
A. Proposal

Item 8
Attachment A

December 9, 2005
Jolene Smith, Executive Director
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County
4000 Moorpark, Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95117
Dear Ms. Smith,

The VMC Foundation respectfully requests that FIRST 5 Santa Clara County consider a
continuation grant of $100,000 each year for the next three years.to help us expand the Reach
Out and Read Assessment Program (RORAP). Last year, in a pilot project, First 5 allowed us
to· expand this program to five, then _ultimately six Santa Clara Valley Medical Center pediatric
clinics. The program has been extremely successful. And because we're now reaching more
kids with the expanded program - we've gone from serving some 10,000 kids to serving 26,000
and we will be at 30,000 within the next few months! - we wish tQ expand our volunteer base
and upgrade our part-time Program Coordinator to, full-time status,.
..
'

RORAP provides early screening for and preliminary assessment of developmental delays and
learning differences for almost 26,000 unduplicated children age 2 months through 5 years at
pediatric check ups each year:

)





.

.

Children are presented with a new, age-appropriate/language appropriate book upon each
visit-to their pediatrician (every 6 to 12 months on average)
The pediatrician demonstrates to the parent(s) how to read with their child, discusses the
importance of reading and how their child's brain will gro\V and develop through
language acquisition
While reviewing the book with the child, the pediatri~ian is also conducting a screening .
for possible learning or developmental delays based on accepted developmental
milestones - using their skills as a pediatrician and their knowledge of each chjld as
he/she grows. Pediatricians refer children with suspected developmental delays,
behavioral concerns or learning differences are referred to the Center for Leaming and
·Achievement in_ Santa Clara County.

By providing early developmental assessment and remediation, RORAP helps to protect children
from public systems that sometimes fail children with foaming disabilities. By addressing
literacy achi_evement and developmental milestones early in a child's life, the Reach Out and
Read Assessment Program helps to increase the chances of effective intervention and
remediation.
As the county's primary provider of direct medical and social services to the indigent and the
poor, the Santa Clara Valley Health & Hospital System clinics serve the lowest income families
of Silicon Valley and provide services to often culturally ancl linguistically isolated patients.
Often our clinics are the only social institution that reaches young children and their families in
these neighborhoods before they enter school or daycare.
Valley Medical Center Foundation
Reach Out and Read Assessment Program

1

December 2005

'

.

.

'

Item 8
Attachment A
The• Reach Out and Read Assessment Program and is now offered at six Valley Health Center
Clinics which provide services to over 15% of the 143,000 children in Santa Clara County under
5 years old. All combined; these six clinics provide approximately 54,000 well-child check-ups
annually, serving approximately 26,000 unduplicated children 2 months to 5 years each year, and
most of them from minority, low-income families: The program has proven remarkably popular,
particularly with our large Hispanic patient.base.
·

Proposed Expansion and Budget
The current Reach Out and Read Assessment Program is a collaborative multi-clinic approach,
offering the effective planning, funding· support and solid grounding of the Santa Clara County
Health & Hospital System and the Valley Medical Center Foundation. Founded in 1988, the
Valley Medical Center Foundation is an independent community..:driven 50l(c)3 public benefit
corporation that enhances community health and related human service needs via the Santa Clara
Valley Health & Hospital System, which includes Valley Medical Center (VMC). In an effort to
enhance and improve existing services, we support services and programs that are under-funded
by other revenue streams and that sen:e ·the most needy in Silicon Valley.
With seed money provided by FIRST 5 Santa Clara County in 2004/2005, we integrated
· developmental· assessment into our existing Reach Out and Read pediatric Literacy program and
expanded the program into a total of six clinics - we call this expanded program the Reach Out
and Read Assessment Program (RORAP).
'

The fivefold increase in our program (six clinics vs. the single East Valley clinic) that took place
in 2005 resulted in a need to more robustly manage our finances. Our part-time Program
Coordinator, Loralie Wheeler, now ·has the complex task of tracking book inventory and stock at
· each clinic, and maintaining orders thiough Scholastic Books, our primary book supplier.
Moreover, we want to have the waiting rooms of all 6 RORAP clinics staffed at all times with
volunteers reading to children and modeling reading behavior. Hence the volunteer management
component of RORAP needs to be further expanded. We thus need to upgrade our part-time
Coordinator to full-time status. ·
Income
FIRST 5 Santa Clara Countv (oendina)
Silver Givina Foundation
Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health (oending}
:

Total

$100,000
$10,000
$50,000
$160,000

:

Expenses
Prooram Coordinator Salarv (1.0 FTE at $22.75/hour)
Phvsician trainina @ $350 oer site x :sites (for aooroximatelv 20 ohvsicians)
Travel (mileage between sites, airfare/accommodations to ROA National
I
Conference)
Office Suoolies, rent, phone, other administrative costs ·
Books (30,000 books @ $3/bookl
Indirect / Administrative @ 8°/4

$47,320
$2,100

a

'

Valley Medical Center Foundation Reach Out and Read Assessment Program

2

$5,500

Total

$3,200
$90,000
$11,722
$159,970
December2005

)

.

""" . ::v
--~

~-

\!
f

Item 8
Attachment A
With the success of the program, more pediatricians are becoming interested in participating.
We therefore have the potential to serve even more children as well as the necessary "buy-in"
from physicians and hospital executive administration to consider a more coordinated approach
to RORAP. Current Reach Out and Read Assessment Program collaborative partners include
FIRST 5 Santa Clara County and our partnership with the Center for Learning and Achievement
which offers a team of specialists in pediatric behavior and to whom we refer children screened
during the RORAP visit that are suspected of having a learning disability. We are also beginning
to partner with the First 5 AmeriCorps program, San Jose State University AmeriCorps, Reach
Out and Read (ROR) (local and National offices) and the Children's Health Council at Stanford.
Additional funding for RORAP will be pursued through the VMC Foundation and its ability to
cultivate new relationships with corporate and foundation philanthropies and also through its
deep roots in the local philanthropic community. The VMC Foundation currently enjoys the
support of a number of Bay Area corporations and foundations including Cypress
Semiconductor, the Knight Foundation, the Koret Foundation, Lockheed Martin Space Systems,
Sobrato Family Foundation, Therma, Inc. and the Valley Foundation. RORAP has garnered
regional attention through Liz Kniss, Chair of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors and
national attention through Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren (who was the speaker-for our Reach Out
and Read event held on April 18, 2005).

)

RORAP uses the access and expertise of pediatric providers to assess child development while
also providing positive literacy interventions. By promoting.cognitive growth and
developmental assessment, the program has proven to be a powerful tool for pediatricians
working with primarily low-income families in an underserved community to help children
thrive intellectually, emotionally and socially. Please join us as we develop the Reach Out and
Read Assessment Program to its potential.
Thank you for your consideration of the proposed partnerships and for your ongoing
commitment to the healthy development of children.through age five. If you would like
additional information please contact me at 408-885-5201 (or via email at
[email protected]) and be sure to visit us at www.vmcfoundation.org. I
look forward to hearing from you soon.
With warmest regards,
Chris Wilder
Executive Director
Valley Medical Center Foundation
iECW/ljc

Valley Medical Center Foundation
Reach Out and Read Assessment Program

3

December 2005

FIRST 5 Santa Clara Gounty
Joint Meeting of
Program and Evaluati.on Committees

FIRST 5

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Meeting Date:
Action:

Dec. 16, 2005

X

Selection Process;

Discussion:
_ _RFP

Submitted By:

----

Item 9 ·

Cathy Andrade, Director and
Laura Buzo, Manager

__RFQ __ Sole Source

Not Applicable

TITLE:
Mexican Heritage Plaza

RECOMMENDED ACTIONS:
Accept the Mexican Heritage Plaza proposal and refer to staff to .review in preparation
for the Commission's 2006 Budget Workshop.
·

SUMMARY OF REQUEST:
The Mexican Heritage Plaza (MHP) is proposing to add an innovative educational
program, the MHP Folklorico Music and Movement Program, in an effort to expand the
scope and breadth of the arts education programs provided in the community. The
Folklorico Music and Movement Program. (FMMP) is a highly participatory
mariachl/folkl6rico class for children ages through 5 years old and their parents.
Through traditional and contemporary folkloric Mexican music and dance, participants
are engaged in hands-on activities designed as preliminary exposure to the artistic and
·
cultural aesthetic of mariachi music and folkloric dance.
With the support of FIRST 5 of Santa Clara County, the Mexican Heritage Plaza can
expand services to San Jose Unified School District and Alum Rock.School District
. through FMMP. It is an opportunity to complete the front end of a full range of artistic
services to these communities and to provide "developmentally, culturally and
linguistically appropriate curriculum content-and activities with specific learning
objectives" to these two communities where children with the greatest number of
cumulative risk factors live. The program proposal is for one calendar year, 2006-2007,:
is in the amount of $75,250 and will serve a total of 1,080 participants.

BACKGROUND:
The Mexican Heritage Plaza (MHP) of San Jose exists to affirm, celebrate and preserve
the rich cultural heritage of the Mexican community and showcase multicultural arts
within the region.
Founded in a partnership with the Redevelopment Agency of the City of San Jose, the
Plaza opened to the public in September 1999. Located in San Jose's Mayfair/Alum
Rock community, it is one of the largest Latino cultural centers in the United States.
Programming
is multidisciplinary, presented at the Plaza, in schools and at outreach
.
.

sites in order to provide educational and arts opportunities for people of all ages that
enrich the region and our diverse American heritage.
·
FISCAL IMPACT:
There is no fiscal impact at this time. The proposal will be considered by the
Commission at their 2006 Budget Workshop.
ATTACHMENTS
A.· Mexican Heritage Plaza Proposal for FIRST 5 Arts Enrichment Initiative andAttachments A, Demographics and B, Curriculum Design

Jolene Smith
Executive Director
FlRST 5 Santa Clara County
4000 Moorpark Avenue; Suite 200
San Jose, CA 95117
Re: Mexican Heritage Plaza Proposal for FlRST 5 Arts Enrichment Initiative
Dear Jolene Smith,
On behalf of the Mexic&n Heritage Plaza, thank you for the opportunity to share with you how the
· Mexican Heritage Plaza in partnership with FIRST 5 Santa Clara County proposes to provide a wonderful
· and innovative early learning and educational program for children and their families.
Background
The Mexican Heritage Plaza (MHP) of San Jose exists tci affirm, celebrate and preserve the rich cultural
heritage of the Mexican community and showcase multicultural arts within the region. .
Founded in a partnership with the Redevelopment Agency of the City of San Jose, the Plaza opened to the
public in September 1999. Located in San Jose's Mayfair/Alum Rock community, it is one of the largest
Latino cultural centers.in the United States. Programming is multidisciplinary, presented at the Plaza, in
schools and .at outreach sites in order to provide educational and arts opportunities for people of all ages
that enrich the region and our diverse American heritage.
Overview ofProgram
· The Mexican Heritage Plaza is proposing to add an innovative educational program, the MHP Folkl6rico
Music and Movement Program, in an effort to expand the scope and breadth of the arts education
programs provided in the community. The Folkl6rico Music and Movement Program (FMMP) is a highly
participatory mariachi/folkl6rico class for children ages 0-Syrs old and their parents. Through traditional ·
and contemporary folkloric Mexican music and dance, participants are engaged in hands-on activities
· ·designed as preliminary exposure to the artistic and cultural aesthetic of mariachi music and folkloric
dance.
With the support of FlRST 5 of Santa Clara County, the Mexican Heritage Plaza can expand services to
San Jose Unified School District and Alum Rock School District through FMMP. It is an opportunity to
co~plete the front end of a full range of artistic services to these communities and to provide
"developmentally, culturally and linguistically appropriate curriculum content and activities with specific ..
learning objectives" to these two communities where children with the greatest number of cumulative _risk
factors live. The Mexican Heritage Plaza will thus join with FlRST 5 of Santa Clara County in their
campaign to "support the healthy development of children through age S and enrich the lives oftheir
families and communities (FlRST S of Santa Clara County)".
Program Specifics
The Mexican Heritage Plaza is proposing to provide at three sites located within the Alum Rock School
District and/or the San Jose Unified School District, twelve (12), ten (10) week class sessions, 1 hour

.. ·17.Q0 Alum Rock Avenue f San Jose, California 95116
408-928-5500 J' www.mhcviva.org

Mexican Heritage Plaza Proposal for First Five
Page 2 of5
duration, for 30 participants (15 children each accompanied by an adult) over the course ofa calendar
year (Jan-March, March-June, Sep-Dec) serving a total population of 1,080 participants and providing
_l 0,800 units of service (unit of service=one hour of instruction per participant). The small student to
_teacher ratio and 10 week per session meeting period guarantees great(;'st amount of impact on .
.participants' skill development.·
At the 15th Annual San Jose International Mariachi Festival in July 2006, up to 300 participants (parents
and_ children) will take a one-hour sample workshop of the Progra.nJ. giving them preliminary exposure to
· aesthetic of the Mariachi/Folkl6nco genre. This is an additional 300 units of service and signifies an
"investment in arts programming for children prenatal through age 5 and their families" as it opens
. Mariachi Festival Workshop offerings to address the needs of this age group. In the Festival
environment, FMMP·becomes even more accessible to the community as outreach and publicity efforts
. -- --- ...: .
are heightened and greater numbers.of participants become aware of the program. .
In total, this proposal reflects over l 1;000 units of service. to the community and almost 1400 participants.
A complete session of the Program· is a series of 10. classes. Class meets once a week for one hour- and is.
_conducted by one arts instructor, Instructors-at.e..chosen for-their background knowledge in mariachi and·
·-· ·- ·· ·
foJlc].6ri50 arts and trained to deliver the FMMP curriculum appropriately. Each class has a maximum. ·
capacity:of 15 children matched· one to one with an adult(preferably a parent, caretaker or otheuelative)~ · · , :·· · .Itis:understood:that.some parents will come.with two and perhaps three children,-at a-time.and this ratio is ·
-.-,-~-~~---~.,--~~ ·••c~~•=us.ually,.workable•. All adults~are .required.to. participate, in.all activities. w.ith..an"abrindance..o£enthusiasm... ~"~'""'' ~-- •.m,·
··~- ·,;.. •-····, ":---~---- , Gbildren ·up·to·S·years:old:participate;-as·theyare·willing-and·able:··-·Parents -are,asked~never·to·force-their····.,._,..,··--i·:··
·
· child to ·do anything. With younger children (infants) parents are coached to, for.example'; move the
·
child's l~gs up and down to the rhythm or tap out the rhythm of music softly cin his/her- belly when the
child is at this younger developmental stage. Older siblings are allowed to attend the class as l~ng as they
are participating in all activities as they are also considered educators in the pre-school child's home. .....1

·It is imperative that classes are conducted in an appropriate space. The optimal !~cation for the J>rogram
is~ closed room devoid of distractions such as too many tables and chairs or other furniture, posters and
· -other artwork on the walls, ope~ windows at a chi_ld' s eye level, unsecured cupboards or drawers that-are ·:
- inevitable temptations to naturally curious little people, electronic equipment and cords within reach and
-·· non-childproofed electrical outlets. Special accommodations are made to disinfect all toys and
-instruments that children use in the course of each class period. Qualified instructors or administrative
staff can help select and set up the ideal location for the class.

· Proposed Budget --(Cost of360 hours of instruction---36 ten- week sessions andFestival workshops)
$22, 500.
· Instructor fees (includes prep time, class time, training, meetings and/or recitals)
· $15,000.
Administrative Support and Fees (10% Program Director; balance is admin. support)_
$6,000.
· Supplies (musical instruments/toys, music, sound equipment)
$3,750.
Payroll taxes and benefits
$3,000.
-Information materials
$15,000.
. Mariachi Festivai Sponsorship for July 2006 and workshops
$10,000.
.Outreach and marketing mariachi festival workshops.
Total
$75,250.00
Subiniffed bv/J

/1- · j

··q~W:vvf
1

M~c~la Davison '.Aviles
President and CEO

·· ··.1100AlumRock Avenue J' San Jose; California 95116
408-928-~500 J' www.mhcviva.org ·

Mexican Heritage flaza Proposal for First Five
Page 3 of 5

ATTACHMENT A
Demographics
The Mexican Heritage Plaza is the leading arts provider for Latinos in San Jose and the only arts
provider operating an arts facility within 50 miles in the-North/South corridor, East of Highway
101. Highway lOJ demarcates East San Jose as an ethnic and largely immigrant enclave. The·
· Mexican Heritage Plaza is situated in and serves a large constituency in the Mayfair
Neighborhood, which relative to the City of San Jose, County of Santa Clara, has proportionally·
. more children in 2000 with '33.8% under the age of 18 as compared to 26.4% for the City as a
whole. In 2000, the residents of Mayfair had a median household_ income of $52,916 as
compared with $70,243 for the City of San Jose; Nearly 72% of Mayfair resident households
had incomes below the City of San Jose median and up fo 25% live below federal poverty ·
guidelines. According to the US Census, approximately 59% of Mayfair'~ population of25.
years or older had only a 12th grade. or lower level of education as compared to 21. 7% of the city
as a whole; Local schools.in the Mum Rock and East Side Union High School Districts report·
· that over 80% of their students are Limited English Proficient; 52% of these students scored
below thelowest quartile mark.

s,~

As'ideiitifie~·byl'J~ST of _Sfuit,a _Clara·Coutj.tY,:_several ·nei~horhoods iri the:'SaifJo~e UiiiJied· ·•··-- .
School District and Alum Rock School District (described in detail above), are communities
where children .with the greatest number. of cumulative risk factors live; Understanding that ''the .
emotional, physical and intellectuaLenvironment that a child is exposed to prior to five years of
age has a profound impact on how his/her brain develops (FIRST 5 of Santa Clara County)",
these children are at high risk of not being school· ready and will be severely below grade level in
· reading and mathematical skills by third grade if the issue is not addressed. The Mexican
Heritage Plaza currently has an established presence in both of these school districts and believes
·
that services offered through FMMP can positively impact this situation.

· ·1700 Alum·Rock Avenue J SanJose, California 95116
408-928-5500 J' www~mhcviva.org

.:.

Mexican Heritage Plaza Proposal for First Five
Page 4 of 5

ATTACHMENT B
Curriculum Design
. The FMMP curriculum was developed based on research conducted by Maria de la Rosa,
. Director of Heritage Programs at the Mexican Heritage Plaza Maria holds a Masters in
Education from Stanford University and-resourced material such as "California Public Schools
· Visual _and PerforniingArts Fquneworks", "f:lre-.~i;_J.dergarten Learning and Deyelopment
Guidelines;' published by the California Department of Education, "Como estimular el cerebro
-infantil: una guia para padres de familia" published by the US Department of Education,
.. ~'Mommy and Me"infant/preschool music.classes and her 15+years of Mexican folkloric dance
~aining and artistic direction in the development of this course.
· ·
.Ten one hour lessons rely largely on repetitive and increasingly articulated dances and songs to ·
· teach parents the necessity of modeling.for, interacting with and allowing for creati,ve
development of their children. Instructors express to parents that alt activities should be also
. repeated in the. home environmentthereby reinforcing parents' role as educators. Classes can be ·
. . taught in Spanish or English or bilingually. All material used in class is from the traditional or·
<::ontemporary Mexican/Latino. folk.genre reinforcing cultural expressions already housed in.
··- family values .. Parents·learnthatthe traditionarreperto'ire i~ mo:re•·thanjust silly sc:m'.gs·and funny
--dances. They are valu~ble teaching-tools-in the early-literary and social development of their.. child. Participating in the Program can naturally provide a sense of validation among parents
·who may feel limi~ed as their children's educators if they themselves have limited levels of
education or are monolingual Spanish Speakers. The language skills that parents and children
develop-together in FMMP are transferable across languages.
. In terms .of curriculum content, the Program has complementary curricular objectives. In
· addition to addressing key content standards from the California State Frameworks for Visual
. and Performing Arts at the kindergarten level, participants enjoy activities and competencies
. related to Language Arts Standards for the end of kindergarten.
Songs such as "La Acamaya" include repetitive use of phonemes that, when n;1outh~d by parents
and other adults in the class to the infants, encourage them to babble and to imitate the adults
thereby developing facial and lingual muscles needed for speech production. Development of.
. phoneme production is an early reading and language skill that is often overlooked in the early
childhood education, pre-kindergarten stages at home. Older children are able to reproduce the
phonemes themselves and learn the lyrics to the songs.
.
. The "Banda.Loca" ("Crazy Band") activity not only exposes children (and parents) to new and
·t:raditional Latin music but also develops musical skills (including beat, tempo, phrasing and
dynamics), gross motor skills (through grasping musical toys and reaching above, behind and in
. front of oneself or clashing together objects such as a bongo and stick) and encourages creative
play. (essential ·in the development of independence and creative problem solving) in that the
· child decides which rhythm to follow and which musical instrument to play. ·
· ··1700 Alum Rock Avenue f San· Jose, ·California 95116'
408-928-5500 f www.mhcviva.org

r

.

Mexican Heritage Plaza Proposal for First Five
Page 5 of 5
Dances such as "Son de los enanos" not only encourage active imagination as children (a:nd ·
adults!) suddenly become "enanos" ("dwarves") but also address gross motor skill development
as little ones learn.to shift their weight from side to side, crouch, alternate kicking feet and hop
·along on the ground. Adults get a nice aerobic workout in addition to modeling for their children_
· and developing a healthy, creative, wildly imaginative educational experience for them! Basic
locomotor skills used in this and.other dances thr<;mghout the course.require response to a wide
·range. of opposites such as high/low, fast/slow, forward/backward, etc., addressing a key content st_andard for_ D~~e at the_ kindergarten level.
·
·
Fine motor-skill development is addressed in the course of songs ~hat have finger play associated
with them and for,activities in which small, egg-like "sonajas" (rattles) are used to shake-out the•
rhythm-of a song. Tactile development is inevitable in the use of the "sonajas"· especially for· ·
infants whose natural inclination is to put objects in their mouths as taste is the first of the senses ·
. to develop and that is how they "read" the world at this stage.

· ~- .. · · ·1700 Ahnn Rock A venue I San Jose, California 95116
408-928-5500 I www.mhcviva.otg
Document

Agenda includes Fiscal Year 2006-2007 Budget Presentation including New Funding Requests.

Collection

James T. Beall, Jr.

Content Type

Agenda

Resource Type

Document

Date

05/09/2006

District

District 4

Creator

FIRST 5 of Santa Clara County

Language

English

Rights

No Copyright: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/NoC-US/1.0/